Author Topic: Free Flow Discussion about POIS  (Read 578933 times)

aalkaff

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Re: This may seem like a familiar place.
« Reply #135 on: August 08, 2012, 12:53:50 PM »
I didn't wait to get referred to an endocrinogist. I barged right in!

30+ years of POIS agony, I had zero patience .

In some countries you can't do that Demo. Seriously, you cannot see a specialist without an explicit referral (in writing with paper trail) from a "family doctor". That might sound like nuts but the end result is that it makes POIS almost impossible to discuss with any doctor. I've been referred to shrinks 3 times for suggesting I might have POIS. Different doctors of course! I've come to the conclusion that these doctors need to be referred to psychiatrists themselves to deal with their delusions of infallibility :D

FFFFFFFFFFFFFFUCKKKKKKKKK POIS!!!

There, just wanted to get that off my chest.

A few months ago, I went on a search for an endocrinologist who'd be willing to work with me and supervise my treatment attempts. I was a bit surprised to discover that we've got a whole lot of jerks in Dubai with 'Dr.' before their names. The areas of government health and government education are perhaps the worst over here, with private institutions being about average. We spent money on a lot of things but missed the mark in those two critical areas. Anyway, governement/society problems aside, I don't want to give up, and I'll restart the search, especially because I don't know when my employer's patience will run out, what with the weekly one-to-two sick days off I keep taking.

So, is an endocrinologist the best doc for the job? And have you guys explored online correspondence with one? For a fee even? (A great business idea for doctors :D)

aalkaff

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Re: This may seem like a familiar place.
« Reply #136 on: August 08, 2012, 01:08:11 PM »
It could be explained by semen in the mixture of my pee, meaning semen is somehow getting into my bladder which is causing my symptoms (because of pois of corse). This phenomenon is called retrograde ejaculation. It happens when the shutter between the bladder and prostate doesn't shut tight enough.
Stimulating the penis causes sperm to be released and enter the bladder through the weakened shutter or actually makes the shutter weak and allows a flow of semen into the bladder.

I wonder if this is the reason of some POISers getting mild POIS from arousal or having symptoms that donĀ“t go away . This just makes a lot of sense.

As you know, I don't have much POIS now, but I DO notice, that if I go for a little more than 10 days, that some symptoms start coming back. I attribute this to simple assimilation of sperm by the body, which has been building up, with no place to go.

The body starts to dispose of it, and I start to get more symptoms. If I take niacin and have sex, everything resets to "hunky dorry"



I'm not sure if I've got the same cause(s), but I get POIS or at least POIS-like symptoms when I feel I'm 'loaded'. For me, that's usually on the third or fourth day since the last O. Yeah, I know--I've got problems abstaining from any sexual activity for more than a couple of days. A lot of will power and self-trickery is required, which are scarce in my case, because of POIS--Catch-22.

Hmm, I should probably search for posts on how to reduce libido and/or sperm production. Without surgery. I hope.

demografx

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Re: This may seem like a familiar place.
« Reply #137 on: August 08, 2012, 02:11:22 PM »
I didn't wait to get referred to an endocrinogist. I barged right in!

30+ years of POIS agony, I had zero patience .

In some countries you can't do that Demo. Seriously, you cannot see a specialist without an explicit referral (in writing with paper trail) from a "family doctor". That might sound like nuts but the end result is that it makes POIS almost impossible to discuss with any doctor. I've been referred to shrinks 3 times for suggesting I might have POIS. Different doctors of course! I've come to the conclusion that these doctors need to be referred to psychiatrists themselves to deal with their delusions of infallibility :D

That's horrible!

Thanks for reminding me that I'm LUCKY that I could "just barge in" to a specialist's office. Here where I live you can do that but you might pay astronomical "out of network" charges!

The referral system in some locales is terrible.
10 years of significant POIS-reduction, treatment consisting of daily (365 days/year) testosterone patches.

TRT must be checked out carefully with your doctor due to fertility, cardiac and other risks.

40+ years of severe 4-days-POIS, married, raised a family, started/ran a business

demografx

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Re: This may seem like a familiar place.
« Reply #138 on: August 08, 2012, 02:31:53 PM »

FFFFFFFFFFFFFFUCKKKKKKKKK POIS!!!



I CONCUR!!!


10 years of significant POIS-reduction, treatment consisting of daily (365 days/year) testosterone patches.

TRT must be checked out carefully with your doctor due to fertility, cardiac and other risks.

40+ years of severe 4-days-POIS, married, raised a family, started/ran a business

demografx

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Re: This may seem like a familiar place.
« Reply #139 on: August 08, 2012, 06:16:30 PM »
The above is an example of freedom of speech that relieves some of my tension as well as Ali's.

Prohibited at the other forum.
10 years of significant POIS-reduction, treatment consisting of daily (365 days/year) testosterone patches.

TRT must be checked out carefully with your doctor due to fertility, cardiac and other risks.

40+ years of severe 4-days-POIS, married, raised a family, started/ran a business

demografx

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Re: This may seem like a familar place.
« Reply #140 on: August 08, 2012, 06:18:31 PM »



$9,270.00 $9,350.00 $10,272.00 $10,802.00 raised    
THANK YOU TO THE RETURNING MONTHLY DONOR!!!!
towards our $33,500 goal.


Click here to CURE POIS:





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10 years of significant POIS-reduction, treatment consisting of daily (365 days/year) testosterone patches.

TRT must be checked out carefully with your doctor due to fertility, cardiac and other risks.

40+ years of severe 4-days-POIS, married, raised a family, started/ran a business

demografx

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Re: This may seem like a familiar place.
« Reply #141 on: August 09, 2012, 09:36:05 AM »

Is an endocrinologist the best doc for the job?


In 2007-2008, the forum's "group wisdom" at that time (it was a very small POIS forum) was that POIS was a hormonal disorder, and that an endocrinologist would be a good choice to supervise what was recommended: a full hormonal bloodtesting/workup. (Waldinger's research study partner was and still is a Dutch endocrinologist, Dr Dave Schwartz, Netherlands.).

I was advised that a university endocrinologist would be a good idea because they teach and do research and would thus be more open to POIS than "by the textbook" doctors. In this case, I also felt the university medical lab was far more sophisticated than anything I had ever seen in private doctors' offices.

My bloodtesting revealed low testosterone. Much earlier, I had tried injections unsuccessfully and was told that this is because of the "spiking" effect, but testosterone patches and testosterone gel deliver a more uniform steady flow of testosterone throughout the system 24/7, which mimics the way the body actually delivers T naturally.

I was enraged and furious after 30 years of this SHIT, so I intensely absorbed the forum ideas in 2007 (I RESISTED doing an endocrinology workup at first) and found a cure. But I think I was very lucky.
« Last Edit: August 09, 2012, 10:41:25 AM by demografx »
10 years of significant POIS-reduction, treatment consisting of daily (365 days/year) testosterone patches.

TRT must be checked out carefully with your doctor due to fertility, cardiac and other risks.

40+ years of severe 4-days-POIS, married, raised a family, started/ran a business

kurtosis

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Re: This may seem like a familiar place.
« Reply #142 on: August 09, 2012, 12:16:39 PM »

Is an endocrinologist the best doc for the job?


In 2007-2008, the forum's "group wisdom" at that time (it was a very small POIS forum) was that POIS was a hormonal disorder, and that an endocrinologist would be a good choice to supervise what was recommended: a full hormonal bloodtesting/workup. (Waldinger's research study partner was and still is a Dutch endocrinologist, Dr Dave Schwartz, Netherlands.).

I was advised that a university endocrinologist would be a good idea because they teach and do research and would thus be more open to POIS than "by the textbook" doctors. In this case, I also felt the university medical lab was far more sophisticated than anything I had ever seen in private doctors' offices.

My bloodtesting revealed low testosterone. Much earlier, I had tried injections unsuccessfully and was told that this is because of the "spiking" effect, but testosterone patches and testosterone gel deliver a more uniform steady flow of testosterone throughout the system 24/7, which mimics the way the body actually delivers T naturally.

I was enraged and furious after 30 years of this SHIT, so I intensely absorbed the forum ideas in 2007 (I RESISTED doing an endocrinology workup at first) and found a cure. But I think I was very lucky.

There's another great reason why university endocrinologists are useful to talk to about POIS or any similar disease involving fatigue and cognitive symptoms with mysterious origins. They're expected to publish papers and will actually have a vested interest in treating your illness and finding out what might be causing it. It might seem odd but most doctors have a professional requirement to make a best-judgement diagnosis but not a diagnosis that would withstand scrutiny in a peer review journal. For example, you won't find any journal papers that conclude with "the symptoms were mysterious, the patient appeared intense and upset so I bundled them off to the psychiatrist. Cheque please!"

aalkaff

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Re: This may seem like a familiar place.
« Reply #143 on: August 09, 2012, 01:52:58 PM »

Is an endocrinologist the best doc for the job?


In 2007-2008, the forum's "group wisdom" at that time (it was a very small POIS forum) was that POIS was a hormonal disorder, and that an endocrinologist would be a good choice to supervise what was recommended: a full hormonal bloodtesting/workup. (Waldinger's research study partner was and still is a Dutch endocrinologist, Dr Dave Schwartz, Netherlands.).

I was advised that a university endocrinologist would be a good idea because they teach and do research and would thus be more open to POIS than "by the textbook" doctors. In this case, I also felt the university medical lab was far more sophisticated than anything I had ever seen in private doctors' offices.

My bloodtesting revealed low testosterone. Much earlier, I had tried injections unsuccessfully and was told that this is because of the "spiking" effect, but testosterone patches and testosterone gel deliver a more uniform steady flow of testosterone throughout the system 24/7, which mimics the way the body actually delivers T naturally.

I was enraged and furious after 30 years of this SHIT, so I intensely absorbed the forum ideas in 2007 (I RESISTED doing an endocrinology workup at first) and found a cure. But I think I was very lucky.

Wow, I never thought of a university MD. I'm not sure we have those here :P And about the testerone patches/gel, I think they must be prescribed over here--not available over the counter.

aalkaff

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Re: This may seem like a familiar place.
« Reply #144 on: August 09, 2012, 01:55:00 PM »
...For example, you won't find any journal papers that conclude with "the symptoms were mysterious, the patient appeared intense and upset so I bundled them off to the psychiatrist. Cheque please!"

LOL! :D

demografx

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Re: This may seem like a familiar place.
« Reply #145 on: August 09, 2012, 06:47:20 PM »
...For example, you won't find any journal papers that conclude with "the symptoms were mysterious, the patient appeared intense and upset so I bundled them off to the psychiatrist. Cheque please!"

LOL! :D

ditto lol!!
10 years of significant POIS-reduction, treatment consisting of daily (365 days/year) testosterone patches.

TRT must be checked out carefully with your doctor due to fertility, cardiac and other risks.

40+ years of severe 4-days-POIS, married, raised a family, started/ran a business

demografx

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Re: This may seem like a familiar place.
« Reply #146 on: August 09, 2012, 06:52:40 PM »

Is an endocrinologist the best doc for the job?


In 2007-2008, the forum's "group wisdom" at that time (it was a very small POIS forum) was that POIS was a hormonal disorder, and that an endocrinologist would be a good choice to supervise what was recommended: a full hormonal bloodtesting/workup. (Waldinger's research study partner was and still is a Dutch endocrinologist, Dr Dave Schwartz, Netherlands.).

I was advised that a university endocrinologist would be a good idea because they teach and do research and would thus be more open to POIS than "by the textbook" doctors. In this case, I also felt the university medical lab was far more sophisticated than anything I had ever seen in private doctors' offices.

My bloodtesting revealed low testosterone. Much earlier, I had tried injections unsuccessfully and was told that this is because of the "spiking" effect, but testosterone patches and testosterone gel deliver a more uniform steady flow of testosterone throughout the system 24/7, which mimics the way the body actually delivers T naturally.

I was enraged and furious after 30 years of this SHIT, so I intensely absorbed the forum ideas in 2007 (I RESISTED doing an endocrinology workup at first) and found a cure. But I think I was very lucky.

Wow, I never thought of a university MD. I'm not sure we have those here :P And about the testerone patches/gel, I think they must be prescribed over here--not available over the counter.


Here, patches and gel must also be prescribed, never over the counter. I take 10 mg daily  (2 patches) of Androderm (Watson Pharma is the manufacturer).
10 years of significant POIS-reduction, treatment consisting of daily (365 days/year) testosterone patches.

TRT must be checked out carefully with your doctor due to fertility, cardiac and other risks.

40+ years of severe 4-days-POIS, married, raised a family, started/ran a business

demografx

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Re: This may seem like a familiar place.
« Reply #147 on: August 09, 2012, 07:09:54 PM »

So, is an endocrinologist the best doc for the job? And have you guys explored online correspondence with one? For a fee even? (A great business idea for doctors :D)


This is NOT an endorsement, but I see that endocrinology practitioners do sell their advice online. This is just one random example I pulled from a Google search :
http://www.liveperson.com/experts/health-medicine/specialty-medicine/endocrinology/

Best wishes! Your creativity, Ali, will overcome the hurdles of Dubai I'm sure.
10 years of significant POIS-reduction, treatment consisting of daily (365 days/year) testosterone patches.

TRT must be checked out carefully with your doctor due to fertility, cardiac and other risks.

40+ years of severe 4-days-POIS, married, raised a family, started/ran a business

kurtosis

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Re: This may seem like a familiar place.
« Reply #148 on: August 10, 2012, 05:51:17 AM »
...For example, you won't find any journal papers that conclude with "the symptoms were mysterious, the patient appeared intense and upset so I bundled them off to the psychiatrist. Cheque please!"

LOL! :D

ditto lol!!

Hey, if you still have a sense of humour after nearly 2 decades of POIS, you can survive anything right? :D

demografx

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Re: This may seem like a familiar place.
« Reply #149 on: August 10, 2012, 12:54:14 PM »
...For example, you won't find any journal papers that conclude with "the symptoms were mysterious, the patient appeared intense and upset so I bundled them off to the psychiatrist. Cheque please!"

LOL! :D

ditto lol!!

Hey, if you still have a sense of humour after nearly 2 decades of POIS, you can survive anything right? :D
     
<wild applause>

kurtosis, you speak the truth! After 3 decades, I kept my humor regardless of whether anyone thought I was funny  :)
10 years of significant POIS-reduction, treatment consisting of daily (365 days/year) testosterone patches.

TRT must be checked out carefully with your doctor due to fertility, cardiac and other risks.

40+ years of severe 4-days-POIS, married, raised a family, started/ran a business