Author Topic: Muon's Case  (Read 12974 times)

Muon

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Re: Muon's Case
« Reply #30 on: December 21, 2019, 10:52:57 AM »
Do you think this might be the cause of your issues?
I have no idea Simon. I'm triggering activity in my body by certain triggers, also in a slow smoldering and lingering way. You could make a case for viral reactivation but I'm leaning more towards mast cell activation. I'm not jumping on any potential cause for the full 100% though. 

Simon66

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Re: Muon's Case
« Reply #31 on: January 10, 2020, 11:44:08 AM »
Do you get acne or other skin infections?
Disclaimer: Please research all supplements thoroughly and take them at your own risk. I am not responsible for any adverse reaction you may suffer.

Avoid all Fluoroquinolone antibiotics including Ciprofloxacin, Levaquin and Avelox.

Muon

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Re: Muon's Case
« Reply #32 on: January 13, 2020, 05:22:49 PM »
Do you get acne or other skin infections?
On my shoulders and back there is something that resembles acne but dermatologists are not 100% sure it's acne. It's seems to show up together with symptoms. They say it might come from overactive sebaceous glands.

Only a few innocent fungal skin infections, but these were developing really slowly and were easily countered.

Oh a few post back I talked about smoldering and lingering activty. I recently contracted the flu from my dad and this behaviour was more intense than usual especially at the onset of the flu.
« Last Edit: January 14, 2020, 11:49:47 AM by Muon »

Simon66

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Re: Muon's Case
« Reply #33 on: January 21, 2020, 10:28:16 AM »
Have you tested your prolactin levels soon after an O? These links might interest you:

https://www.issm.info/news/sex-health-headlines/post-orgasmic-prolactin-surges/
http://forums.rxmuscle.com/archive/index.php/t-7428.html

I am currently using some vitamin B6 to see if makes any difference to my symptoms. As you know, my Prolactin came back high in August 2019.
Disclaimer: Please research all supplements thoroughly and take them at your own risk. I am not responsible for any adverse reaction you may suffer.

Avoid all Fluoroquinolone antibiotics including Ciprofloxacin, Levaquin and Avelox.

Muon

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Re: Muon's Case
« Reply #34 on: January 21, 2020, 02:48:21 PM »
No. The only hormones that have been measured are thyroid hormones. Somehow nobody took the effort testing for other hormones.
« Last Edit: January 21, 2020, 02:50:11 PM by Muon »

Simon66

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Re: Muon's Case
« Reply #35 on: January 22, 2020, 02:16:37 PM »
No. The only hormones that have been measured are thyroid hormones. Somehow nobody took the effort testing for other hormones.

I guess if you are going to get Prolactin checked, make sure it's after an O.

I actually did one of those home finger prick tests that I mailed to the laboratory, they're not too expensive. My high prolactin level was tested about 10 hours after an O so maybe this is something other people on this forum might want to check.

I tended to find that my sex drive would go away for about a week after an O so I guess that's how long it takes for my prolactin to drop down to normal levels. I haven't actually checked my prolactin 1 week after an O though so this is speculation.
Disclaimer: Please research all supplements thoroughly and take them at your own risk. I am not responsible for any adverse reaction you may suffer.

Avoid all Fluoroquinolone antibiotics including Ciprofloxacin, Levaquin and Avelox.

Muon

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Re: Muon's Case
« Reply #36 on: January 27, 2020, 05:10:25 PM »
Strange I had an orgasm with almost zero POIS symptoms. A small area close to the center of the brain stabilized within a few minutes (rough estimate, could be a bit longer) after orgasm. I thought there was no problem in that area at that specific moment until the quick transition to a more 'normal' like state happened, the 'normal' state feels less active, much calmer. My libido also made a big change during the last 1.5 months from high to low and POIS symptoms have slightly improved, probably due to prolonged cold weather conditions.

« Last Edit: January 27, 2020, 05:14:06 PM by Muon »

Muon

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Re: Muon's Case
« Reply #37 on: February 05, 2020, 11:06:21 AM »
Strange I had an orgasm with almost zero POIS symptoms.

https://youtu.be/t87dsMDXPZ4?t=220

I did nothing to cause this unlike the claim from the guy in the video, but it was quite cold in my room at moment of orgasm (I wasn't cold) which benefits my POIS. My POIS symptoms seem to be trending in the right direction at the moment but very slowly, in a creeping manner, let's hope it continues that way for the next upcoming years. In MCAD symptoms come and go, it can take years to decades.

Avoidance of triggers might make mast cells less triggery, as in lowering its threshold. Receptor density might diminish in abstence of a trigger. He might have avoided a different trigger not mentioned in the video like alcohol. His POIS might have resolved spontaneously aside from avoiding triggers (which happens to other symptoms I got so I'm not surprised by this).

Muon

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Re: Muon's Case
« Reply #38 on: February 10, 2020, 09:23:19 PM »
This paper proposes the following diagnostic criteria for MCAS, table 2:

Often seen, rarely recognized: mast cell activation disease - a guide to diagnosis and therapeutic options

1) Major criteria 1 + Major critera 2

Or 2) Major criteria 2 + at least one minor criterion

Diagnosis could already be made in my case. Major criteria 2 + minor criterion 4 (11-b-PGF2a)
  • History of symptoms are more important than the current state of symptoms
  • Dynamics of symptoms are perhaps more relevant than the type of symptom, I have no motivation to list all of that, it's daunting
  • Every therapeutic option listed here should be tried: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/suppl/10.3109/07853890.2016.1161231?scroll=top
  • Even out of POIS low grade inflammation is present and should be surpressed by above options.
  • Family history should be considered
  • Mutations of genes in table 2 should be investigated: The genetic basis of mast cell activation disease - looking through a glass darkly
  • A program should be made, lifestyle changes, diet, fysio therapy exercises which are smeared out over the day in combination with a medicine that takes away some of the inflammatory behaviour
  • Triggers should be avoided 24/7 at all cost
I'm not getting one step further without some help of doctors. I get the impression that my lower part of the spine is deteriorating by low grade inflammation. These are smoldering fires which lingers around and can turn into more intense inflammation by triggers which can lead to flares in other parts of the body.