Author Topic: Traumatic brain injury, thyroid, liver and adrenal problems  (Read 1073 times)

yesyesyes

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Traumatic brain injury, thyroid, liver and adrenal problems
« on: March 24, 2023, 03:33:17 PM »
I have an autoimmune hyperthyroidism and high levels of testosterone but also high SHBG and usually low DHT. I suspect low LH because when I take a hCG (Human Chorionic Gonadotropin) injection I feel more like my real self and depression and anxiety seem to disappear. I also feel and act manlier so to say. I also took IGF-1 with it.  :)

By some signs I might have (had) a light case of Kallmann's syndrome and I also have developped Pectus excavatum in my teans so there's probably a connective tissue connection with POIS.

I certainly developed hyperthyroidism in my late teens. I also have been dx with fatty liver.

The whole HPA axis seems to be affected or involved in POIS. I know that after taking Ashwagandha (sp) I have felt worse and more depressed than before so even if you have adrenal problems be wary of that herb. For me it was too stimulating and caused me anxiety, like I've drank many coffees.

BTW I'm caffeine intolerant, so I suspect both the liver and adrenals are affected in POIS people or maybe they might make POIS worse.

Strangely I was a healthy child before my teens. I suspect it all started after I fell on ice and hit my head.
This https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/17570066/ study says:

"In survivors of traumatic brain injury (TBI), impairment in anterior pituitary hormone function may be an important cause of long-term morbidity. (...) hypothalamic-pituitary structures are vulnerable to damage following head injury. This article (...) shows that hypopituitarism may occur after both mild and severe TBI, with growth hormone and gonadotrophin deficiencies appearing to be most common abnormalities.

Given the critical role of anterior pituitary hormones in the regulation of growth, pubertal and neurocognitive development in childhood, early detection of hormone abnormalities following TBI is important."