Author Topic: Hypersensitivity Megathread  (Read 10534 times)

Muon

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Re: Hypersensitivity Megathread
« Reply #60 on: March 30, 2019, 09:44:53 AM »
Concept: Altered stress state/response(Neuroendocrine dysregulations)--->Immune function---->Delayed-type hypersensitivity?

Enhancing versus suppressive effects of stress hormones on skin immune function.

Abstract
Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions are antigen-specific cell-mediated immune responses that, depending on the antigen, mediate beneficial (e.g., resistance to viruses, bacteria, and fungi) or harmful (e.g., allergic dermatitis and autoimmunity) aspects of immune function. Contrary to the idea that stress suppresses immunity, we have reported that short-duration stressors significantly enhance skin DTH and that a stress-induced trafficking of leukocytes to the skin may mediate this immunoenhancement.

Here, we identify the hormonal mediators of a stress-induced enhancement of skin immunity. Adrenalectomy, which eliminates the glucocorticoid and epinephrine stress response, eliminated the stress-induced enhancement of skin DTH. Low-dose corticosterone or epinephrine administration significantly enhanced skin DTH and produced a significant increase in the number of T cells in lymph nodes draining the site of the DTH reaction. In contrast, high-dose corticosterone, chronic corticosterone, or low-dose dexamethasone administration significantly suppressed skin DTH.

These results suggest a role for adrenal stress hormones as endogenous immunoenhancing agents. These results also show that hormones released during an acute stress response may help prepare the immune system for potential challenges (e.g., wounding or infection) for which stress perception by the brain may serve as an early warning signal.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9927693

Is CRH worth investigating? (HPA/CRH hyperactivity?)

Brain-immune interactions and disease susceptibility



Schematic illustration of neural immune connections. The figure shows immune signaling of the CNS via systemic routes and the vagus nerve (Vagus n.) and CNS regulation of immunity via the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA), hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) and hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axes, and the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and parasympathetic nervous system (PNS). Cytokine expression within the CNS is represented by asterisks within the brain. Dotted lines represent negative regulatory pathways, and solid lines represent positive regulatory pathways. CRH, corticotrophin-releasing hormone; AVP, arginine vasopressin; TRH, thyrotropin-releasing hormone; GnRH, gonadotropin-releasing hormone; ACTH, adrenocorticotrophin hormone; TSH, thyroid-stimulating hormone; T4, thyroxine; T3, triiodothyronine; LH, luteinizing hormone; FSH, follicle-stimulating hormone; SNS, sympathetic nervous system; PNS, parasympathetic nervous system; LC, locus ceruleus; A1, C1, A2, C2, brainstem adrenergic nuclei.
« Last Edit: March 30, 2019, 12:58:58 PM by Muon »

Muon

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Re: Hypersensitivity Megathread
« Reply #61 on: July 13, 2019, 06:46:31 PM »
''Although IgE and IgG1 are central to the induction of immediate hypersensitivity reactions, our results show that IgLCs have similar activity. IgLCs may therefore be a novel factor in the humoral immune response to antigen exposure. Our findings open new avenues in investigating the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases and their treatments.''

Immunoglobulin-free light chains elicit immediate hypersensitivity-like responses

Has anyone checked this parameter in their serum?

Muon

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Re: Hypersensitivity Megathread
« Reply #62 on: July 21, 2019, 04:29:46 AM »
Has anyone checked this parameter in their serum?
Yes Simon66 did, all normal:
https://poiscenter.com/forums/index.php?topic=2684.msg24995#msg24995

Muon

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Re: Hypersensitivity Megathread
« Reply #63 on: July 25, 2019, 11:42:05 AM »
Would a lymphocyte transformation test be useful for POIS? Might there be other substances present in sperm that could stimulate or suppress lymphocyte proliferation naturally? If overwhelmingly positive, could this antigen-specific memory T cell be isolated and characterized? What receptors are involved?


Iwillbeatthis

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Re: Hypersensitivity Megathread
« Reply #64 on: July 25, 2019, 01:26:14 PM »
Would a lymphocyte transformation test be useful for POIS? Might there be other substances present in sperm that could stimulate or suppress lymphocyte proliferation naturally? If overwhelmingly positive, could this antigen-specific memory T cell be isolated and characterized? What receptors are involved?

I like this idea

Muon

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Re: Hypersensitivity Megathread
« Reply #65 on: July 25, 2019, 03:06:19 PM »
You can read up on the basics here: https://www.imd-berlin.de/en/special-areas-of-competence/lymphocyte-transformation-test-ltt.html

They use it as a diagnostic tool for type IV hypersensitivity aside from skin testing. It makes much sense. You add the (self)-antigen to your own bunch of cells and watch how they grow compared to your control sample. Antigen specific memory T cells make up the for the difference in numbers.

The problem is that, there are 1000's of different molecules in sperm. Perhaps these could affect lymphocyte division. You will need healthy controls to compare results. Some papers seem to prefer LTT over skin pricks.

You could try to filter out the semen and do the testing with seminal fluid. Proteins can be fractioned by mass or size and these fractions can be used again in LTT. Or you can investigate the speciic memory T cell, if there is one involved.

Muon

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Re: Hypersensitivity Megathread
« Reply #66 on: September 18, 2019, 08:49:14 AM »
Hmm it seems that the same lab also offers in-vitro antigen induced th1/th2 cytokine profile testing. What about doing this kind of test with seminal fluid? I already did this test without induction with a potential antigen. You could distinguish orgasmic and ejaculatory effects from eachother.

Link
« Last Edit: September 18, 2019, 08:52:38 AM by Muon »