Author Topic: How to increase blood pressure  (Read 243 times)

BoneBroth

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 219
How to increase blood pressure
« on: November 15, 2020, 06:39:12 PM »
I've had problems with low blood pressure (hypotension) as long as I had POIS and I believe the two are somehow connected. Hypotension is defined as blood pressure lower than 90/60 mm Hg but symptoms can show at higher values. My normal blood pressure slightly higher at around 110/65 (but when I stand up it falls about 5-10 points when it should increase). I have faited several times upon standing up. When my blood pressure go up, the POIS symptoms are better. I believe adrenal exhaustion caused by stress, inflammation and possible food allergies (or POIS itself) are key factors behind hypotension. One way to tell if you have adrenal exhaustion is to do the  Ragland's Blood Pressure Test which is described here.

Here will be a list of things to do to increase blood pressure to normal values.

I urge everyone who has POIS to answer the blood-pressure poll here.

THINGS THAT HELP INCREASE BLOOD PRESSURE(under construction)

  • Food normalize/increase blood sugar levels but a temporary decrease in blood pressure is likely to happen right after meals since blood is concentrated to the digestion area. Eating at least an hour before O and not after might be a good idea.
  • Stay hydrated (1,2)
  • Salt (Na/Sodium)
  • Have small meals more often
  • Avoid alcohol (4)
  • Avoid high-carbohydrate foods (4).
  • Sugar, energy drinks (probably because of increasing blood sugar)
  • Non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs) for pain relief and inflammation
  • Coffeine (4) seems to be causing a temporary blood pressure increase, but in the long run it can cause adrenal exhaustion and chronic low blood pressure
  • Nicotine. Whilie not recommended because of its other terrible effects in the long term, smoking and using other forms of tobacco can give dramatic short-lived rises in blood pressure of 15-20 units. A nicotine gum after orgasm perhaps?

SUPPLEMENTS THAT INCREASES BLOOD PRESSURE (under construction)

Vitamin D
B12 (deficiency in B12 can lead to anemia, which can cause hypotension) (3, 4)
Folate (3, 4)
Vitamin C
Zink
Sodium (Na)
Amino acids: Protein powder, Phenylalanine , tyrosine (6)
Calcium
Coffeine (temporarily vasoconstriction, bad for adrenals in the long run)
Ephedra
Adrenal cortical exctact (ACE)
Licorice (OBS! lowers testosterone)
Ginseng
Rosemary
Green tea
Ginger
Aniseed
Bayberry
Chasteberry
Parsley
Blue cohosh
Vervain
St. John's wort
Capsicum
Pau d'arco
Coltsfoot
Guarana
Cola and broom alkaloids
Gentian
Calamus amines

THINGS THAT LOWER BLOOD PRESSURE (under construction)

Low blood sugar (not eating enough or regulary)
Fasting/intermittent fasting (lowering hight blood pressure according to science. However, I experience favorable increases in blood pressure (and faster puls) during longer fasting (days) and I think that might be a sign of low blood sugar or a health normalizing effect, maybe fasting lowers hight blood pressure and increases low blod pressure)

SUPPLEMENTS / FOODS THAT LOWER BLOOD PRESSURE (under construction)

CAUSES OF HYPOTENSION

Adrenal exhaustion
Hypothyroidism
Heart disease
Dehydration
Kidney disease
Low blood sugar / diabetes
Parkinson's
Food allergies

SYMPTOMS OF HYPOTENSION

https://draxe.com/health/hypotension/

REFERENCES

1. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/100706150639.htm
2. https://draxe.com/health/hypotension/
3. https://www.dietdoctor.com/blood-pressure/low
4. https://www.dietdoctor.com/the-truth-about-salt
5. https://manhattancardiology.com/what-to-eat-to-help-raise-low-blood-pressure/
6. Book: Nutritional medicine lexicon, Peter Wilhelmsson

RELATED FORUM THREADS ETC

POIS and hypotension: https://poiscenter.com/forums/index.php?topic=1554.0
Blood vessel theory: https://poiscenter.com/forums/index.php?topic=1527.msg14346#msg14346
Blood vessel elasticity and migrain/POIS: https://poiscenter.com/forums/index.php?topic=2832.0
2 Gallons of Water a day, with pink salt: https://poiscenter.com/forums/index.php?topic=3246.msg33610#msg33610
Tension in Arterial Walls : http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/ptens3.html
« Last Edit: November 16, 2020, 03:20:25 PM by BoneBroth »

Quantum

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1284
Re: How to increase blood pressure
« Reply #1 on: November 16, 2020, 02:03:19 PM »
Hi BoneBroth,
As you already know, I, too, in POIS acute phase, have marked hypotension.  It has been the first objective way I had found to monitor the beginning and end of my POIS acute phase, by using a blood pressure monitor.   In my case, low blood pressure duration and duration of all POIS symptoms are identical.  I see hypotension as one of many effect of POIS in my case.
One of the best first thing I used to raise my blood pressure enough so that I am functional for work and daily activity is green tea.   It is still part of my pre-pack !

I read your list, and about nicotine, I do not use it, but if anybody want to use it, I strongly suggest you use nicotine gums or lozenges, like those for tobacco cessation aids, instead of cigarettes.  Smoking has no additional benefit over these other sources of nicotine, and has a tons of negative effects on the respiratory systems that nicotine gums and lozenges don't have.

Also, I have a normal, healthy renal function, so I often used salted water in order to raise my blood pressure ( not a good idea if you have renal insufficiency ! ).  Very effective, and quite cheap. I used 2,5 ml ( 1/2 teaspoon) in half a glass of water.  I repeat after 30 to 60 mins if needed.  I combine this with ongoing water intake ( salt alone is not enough, it helps retain the water and raise your liquid volume, but if you are dehydrated, it does not help as much).
By normalizing blood pressure, the extreme fatigue is less, no more fainting sensation, it lowers the exercise intolerance as well. By exercise intolerance, we do not even talk about push ups here - I mean only standing up can become a problem with hypotension, and having to work in a standing position for long periods of time becomes an overwhelming challenge ! Stamina returns to an acceptable level too, although not normal, because my POIS has more bad effects than just low blood pressure.
( but with my overall pre-pack, things become very manageable  see https://poiscenter.com/forums/index.php?topic=2090.msg16604#msg16604 )
« Last Edit: November 16, 2020, 02:06:07 PM by Quantum »
You are 100% responsible for what you do with anything I post on this forum and of any consequence it could have for you.  Forum rule: ""Do not use POISCenter as a substitute for, or to give, medical advice" Read the remaining part at http://poiscenter.com/forums/index.php?topic=1.msg10259#msg10259

Muon

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1704
    • MCAD Thread
Re: How to increase blood pressure
« Reply #2 on: November 16, 2020, 02:09:38 PM »

BoneBroth

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 219
Re: How to increase blood pressure
« Reply #3 on: November 16, 2020, 03:25:00 PM »
Muon, link doesn't work.

Muon

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1704
    • MCAD Thread
Re: How to increase blood pressure
« Reply #4 on: November 16, 2020, 03:36:01 PM »
Muon, link doesn't work.

It's a sci-hub link meaning just replace .se in the weblink by .tw or .do, try those.

BoneBroth

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 219
Re: How to increase blood pressure
« Reply #5 on: November 16, 2020, 05:33:02 PM »
Worked now! On page 199 this is specifically interesting:

"People with PoTS (n = 15) have been found to have a 13% reduction in blood volume compared with healthy controls (n = 14) [1]. In the small PoTS studies, water ingestion of 480 millilitres has been found to reduce the heart rate response to standing by 15 beats per minute (n = 9) [2]. Neuropathic PoTS is thought to result from reduced peripheral vasoconstriction and venous pooling [3]. Increasing oral fluid intake is thought to enhance vasoconstriction in addition to increasing plasma volume [4]?See Table 1. Dehydration is reported by 86% of people with PoTS as a trigger for a number of symptoms, including mental clouding, also known as ?brain fog? (n = 138) [5]. There have been small studies (n  20) that have found rapid ingestion of 480mls of fluid (within 5 minutes), improved subjective symptoms, orthostatic tolerance, ability to tolerate tilt table testing, ability to maintain blood pressure and reduced delta heart rate (heart rate rise on standing), from 123 beats per minute (bpm) to 108 bpm [2, 6?8]. In neuropathic PoTS there is blood pooling in the extremities, with resultant baroreceptor unloading entraining a feedback loop which increases heart rate and aims to restore blood pressure. One study (n = 7) found a positive effect on delta heart rate in PoTS by ingesting soup [9]. A recent study (n = 8) found rapidly ingesting 500mls of mineral water improved orthostatic cognitive function, with a reduction of delta  heart rate of 18 bpm [10]."


...and these recommendations:

  • 3 liters water a day for adults, most in the morning (On hot days or when exercising, additional fluids need to be consumed.)
  • Increase salt intake (unless contraindicated) aiming for 10-12 grams total in one day.
  • Eat small meals and often.
  • Low refined carbohydrate intake.
  • Check for gluten sensitivity and Coeliac disease.
  • Compression garments

It recommends avoiding:

  • soft drinks
  • caffeine
  • alcohol

It seems like the general dryness symptoms many experience during POIS (dry skin, wrinkles, dry lips, no saliva etcetera) is related to dehydration.

Three major hormones are involved in regulating sodium and water balance in the body at the level of the kidney.
1. Antidiuretic hormone (ADH) from the posterior pituitary acts on the kidney to promote water reabsorption, thus preventing its loss in the urine.
2. Aldosterone from the adrenal gland acts on the kidney to promote sodium reabsorption, thus preventing its loss in the urine.
3. Atrial natriuretic hormone(ANH) from the atrium of the heart acts on the kidney to promote sodium excretion so that it is excreted in the urine.

Kidneys and antidiuretic hormone (also known as Vasopressin; arginine vasopressin; AVP; ADH) are responsible for maintaining blood pressure, blood volume and tissue water content by controlling the amount of water and hence the concentration of urine excreted by the kidney. ADH is made by special nerve cells found in an area at the base of the brain known as the hypothalamus. The nerve cells transport the hormone down their nerve fibres (axons) to the pituitary gland where the hormone is released into the bloodstream.

"Low levels of anti-diuretic hormone will cause the kidneys to excrete too much water. Urine volume will increase leading to dehydration and a fall in blood pressure. Low levels of anti-diuretic hormone may indicate damage to the hypothalamus or pituitary gland, or primary polydipsia (compulsive or excessive water drinking). In primary polydipsia, the low level of anti-diuretic hormone represents an effort by the body to get rid of excess water. Diabetes insipidus is a condition where you either make too little anti-diuretic hormone (usually due to a tumour, trauma or inflammation of the pituitary or hypothalamus), or where the kidneys are insensitive to it. Diabetes insipidus is associated with increased thirst and urine production."

https://www.yourhormones.info/hormones/anti-diuretic-hormone/
« Last Edit: November 16, 2020, 06:04:40 PM by BoneBroth »

BoneBroth

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 219
Re: How to increase blood pressure
« Reply #6 on: November 16, 2020, 05:51:30 PM »
Hi BoneBroth,
As you already know, I, too, in POIS acute phase, have marked hypotension.  It has been the first objective way I had found to monitor the beginning and end of my POIS acute phase, by using a blood pressure monitor.   In my case, low blood pressure duration and duration of all POIS symptoms are identical.  I see hypotension as one of many effect of POIS in my case.

I still not fully understand the nature of the blood pressure mechanisms. My BP-meter shows that I have constant low BP (probably slighty lower at POIS), but I can visually see that the veins on my hands and forehead are hugely shifting in size, and that can happen many times during a day (even in a POIS period). When holding my hands down sometimes the veins are like 0,6 cm balloons all over the hand (and visible on the forehead) but one hour later, perhaps after drinking water, eating food or taking same salt, they have shrinked to about 0,2 cm and are hardly noticable when holding the hands at the same position! Thats when I feel better and my headache is better. But when I check the blood pressure and pulse before and after it's almost the same! Can vasoconstriction/dilution be unrelated to the blood pressure? Is my BP-meter not working? I tryed it on the old neighbour lady who has very high BP and that was very confirmed with the BP-meter so it seems to work.
« Last Edit: November 16, 2020, 06:00:34 PM by BoneBroth »

BoneBroth

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 219
Re: How to increase blood pressure
« Reply #7 on: November 17, 2020, 05:32:18 AM »
After a horrible night with low blood pressure, nighthmares and hearing my heart beat (no NE though) I decided this morning to do a water/blood pressure test. My morning blood pressure (while still lying down in bed) was today 105/67 (average values from 4 measures) and pulse 50. Then I drank one litre of water with 0,5 teaspoon sea salt and sat down for 30 minutes watching TV. Then I checked the blood pressure again (5 measures) and it was 117/68 and pulse still 50. So the systolic value had increased by 12 points and I did feel alittle better.


Muon

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1704
    • MCAD Thread
Re: How to increase blood pressure
« Reply #8 on: November 17, 2020, 05:51:19 AM »
I still not fully understand the nature of the blood pressure mechanisms.

See table 2:
Table 2. Selected mast cell mediators and mechanisms through which activated mast cells can induce cardiovascular symptoms.

If MCs are involved and being a dominant factor then BP could be low or high depending on the type of mediator. My mother shows unstable BP fluctuating between high and low.

I've measured HR in my brother as well between lying down and standing which can result in +20 BPS but not hitting POTS criteria of at least 30 BPS. My parents change in HR don't exceed +5 BPS. My brother got POIS as well. POIS is clearly affecting my heart. I get the impression that POIS induces cardiac inflammation plus HR variability/arythmia and sometimes it feels like there is a spasm. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kounis_syndrome

I'm also not surprised if Demo's cardiac arrest is the result of accumulated silent (allergic) inflammation.

Journey

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 307
  • INTP, 19 y.o. aware of POIS since 2019
Re: How to increase blood pressure
« Reply #9 on: November 17, 2020, 08:47:25 AM »
Worked now! On page 199 this is specifically interesting:

"People with PoTS (n = 15) have been found to have a 13% reduction in blood volume compared with healthy controls (n = 14) [1]. In the small PoTS studies, water ingestion of 480 millilitres has been found to reduce the heart rate response to standing by 15 beats per minute (n = 9) [2]. Neuropathic PoTS is thought to result from reduced peripheral vasoconstriction and venous pooling [3]. Increasing oral fluid intake is thought to enhance vasoconstriction in addition to increasing plasma volume [4]?See Table 1. Dehydration is reported by 86% of people with PoTS as a trigger for a number of symptoms, including mental clouding, also known as ?brain fog? (n = 138) [5]. There have been small studies (n  20) that have found rapid ingestion of 480mls of fluid (within 5 minutes), improved subjective symptoms, orthostatic tolerance, ability to tolerate tilt table testing, ability to maintain blood pressure and reduced delta heart rate (heart rate rise on standing), from 123 beats per minute (bpm) to 108 bpm [2, 6?8]. In neuropathic PoTS there is blood pooling in the extremities, with resultant baroreceptor unloading entraining a feedback loop which increases heart rate and aims to restore blood pressure. One study (n = 7) found a positive effect on delta heart rate in PoTS by ingesting soup [9]. A recent study (n = 8) found rapidly ingesting 500mls of mineral water improved orthostatic cognitive function, with a reduction of delta  heart rate of 18 bpm [10]."


...and these recommendations:

  • 3 liters water a day for adults, most in the morning (On hot days or when exercising, additional fluids need to be consumed.)
  • Increase salt intake (unless contraindicated) aiming for 10-12 grams total in one day.
  • Eat small meals and often.
  • Low refined carbohydrate intake.
  • Check for gluten sensitivity and Coeliac disease.
  • Compression garments

It recommends avoiding:

  • soft drinks
  • caffeine
  • alcohol

It seems like the general dryness symptoms many experience during POIS (dry skin, wrinkles, dry lips, no saliva etcetera) is related to dehydration.

Three major hormones are involved in regulating sodium and water balance in the body at the level of the kidney.
1. Antidiuretic hormone (ADH) from the posterior pituitary acts on the kidney to promote water reabsorption, thus preventing its loss in the urine.
2. Aldosterone from the adrenal gland acts on the kidney to promote sodium reabsorption, thus preventing its loss in the urine.
3. Atrial natriuretic hormone(ANH) from the atrium of the heart acts on the kidney to promote sodium excretion so that it is excreted in the urine.

Kidneys and antidiuretic hormone (also known as Vasopressin; arginine vasopressin; AVP; ADH) are responsible for maintaining blood pressure, blood volume and tissue water content by controlling the amount of water and hence the concentration of urine excreted by the kidney. ADH is made by special nerve cells found in an area at the base of the brain known as the hypothalamus. The nerve cells transport the hormone down their nerve fibres (axons) to the pituitary gland where the hormone is released into the bloodstream.

"Low levels of anti-diuretic hormone will cause the kidneys to excrete too much water. Urine volume will increase leading to dehydration and a fall in blood pressure. Low levels of anti-diuretic hormone may indicate damage to the hypothalamus or pituitary gland, or primary polydipsia (compulsive or excessive water drinking). In primary polydipsia, the low level of anti-diuretic hormone represents an effort by the body to get rid of excess water. Diabetes insipidus is a condition where you either make too little anti-diuretic hormone (usually due to a tumour, trauma or inflammation of the pituitary or hypothalamus), or where the kidneys are insensitive to it. Diabetes insipidus is associated with increased thirst and urine production."

https://www.yourhormones.info/hormones/anti-diuretic-hormone/
If someone gets deydrated and wants to drink more water in POIS it could mean that there's inflammation in the area responsible for managing these hormones?
INTP, 19 y.o. aware of POIS since 2019 when realized by abstaining that O/WD gives POIS, likely had it since puberty, fatigue, brainfog, clumsier, slower thinking/processing, voice volume goes down, sometimes harder to look in eyes, lower stamina/strength

BoneBroth

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 219
Re: How to increase blood pressure
« Reply #10 on: November 17, 2020, 10:44:18 AM »
Yes, I think so. Headache means inflammation in the brain. The pituitary is in the brain.

Muon

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1704
    • MCAD Thread
Re: How to increase blood pressure
« Reply #11 on: November 20, 2020, 08:25:55 AM »
History --> High  blood  pressure  (145/90  mm  Hg)
https://poiscenter.com/forums/index.php?topic=2684.msg31172#msg31172

They didn't measure change in Heart Rate (HR) for the following case. BP can stay approximately the same. But there could be a change in BP which is being compensated by HR and thus, as a result, a significant change in BP won't be seen if HR rises. https://poiscenter.com/forums/index.php?topic=2684.msg30670#msg30670

Doctors could take a look at the change in HR between prone and standing. Patients need to lay down for a while so that their HR stabilizes. For example when they rise from the chair to walk over to the bench to lay down, their HR might go up. When it doesn't stabilize fast enough you get false measurements, head position needs to be flat. Easy measurement that every health care provider and patient can do.
« Last Edit: November 20, 2020, 08:53:37 AM by Muon »

VagSmasher

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 35
Re: How to increase blood pressure
« Reply #12 on: November 24, 2020, 07:51:46 PM »
Tribulis is good at raising blood pressure
Symptoms: Brain Fog, Frustration, stuffed nose, anger, anxiety, and feel zoned out.

berlin1984

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 281
  • Use Adaptogens and Antioxidants, they can help.
Re: How to increase blood pressure
« Reply #13 on: December 03, 2020, 03:31:23 PM »
Tribulis is good at raising blood pressure

Linking the tribulus thread, maybe we can combine experiences there:
https://poiscenter.com/forums/index.php?topic=3371
Please vote on: https://poiscenter.com/forums/index.php?topic=3386.0
(There's real science behind it, not Astrology..)

My Protocol

BoneBroth

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 219
Re: How to increase blood pressure
« Reply #14 on: December 03, 2020, 06:42:13 PM »
The link concerning Tribulus in the Tribulus thread adresses it as "The herb can lower your blood pressure by inhibiting ACE, an enzyme that narrows down the blood vessels". Do you have some references that it increases low blood pressure?