Author Topic: Why some deny/ignore/are sceptical of POIS?  (Read 374 times)

Journey

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  • INTP, 19 y.o. aware of POIS since 2019
Why some deny/ignore/are sceptical of POIS?
« on: November 04, 2020, 02:13:43 PM »
Despite years of many people exchanging information a condition induced by the same thing (orgasms) with many having similar symptoms and similar things reducing them and in general many stuff discovered that reduces or eliminates POIS and some having permanently cured it and many having noticed symptoms before even hearing about anyone else having same thus outruling the possibility of it induced by hearing others talk about such symptoms yet some doctors think it's mental yet many POISers have had it disappear after specific PHYSICAL occurences e.g. being ill, taking medicine or supplement that focuses on PHYSICAL aspects not MENTAL medicine and cases of gut microbiome change solving it cases of other underlaying PHYSICAL disorder being cured reducing or making POIS go away and so on.

Clues

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Re: Why some deny/ignore/are sceptical of POIS?
« Reply #1 on: November 06, 2020, 03:22:07 AM »
This blows my mind as well Journey. But I don't think it's exclusive to POIS. My experience with the healthcare system here in Norway is that when you present symptoms that a doctor hasn't learned about in school, his/her reaction will be one of the following:
  • Denial
  • Claiming it's imagined or ultimately a psychological issue
  • Showing empathy but not actually doing the research and learning required to help you
Our local healthcare system, and I believe this goes for most countries and even the state of medical research in general, has a massive blind spot when it comes to chronic disorders. And the healthcare system (here at least) is not set up in such a way that doctors can take time out to read up on recent research in order to help an individual patient. IMO it's probably hard for doctors to accept and acknowledge that they are out of their depth and cannot help a patient. Easier to blame the symptoms on hypochondria or other mental problems.

Iwillbeatthis

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Re: Why some deny/ignore/are sceptical of POIS?
« Reply #2 on: November 06, 2020, 01:36:10 PM »
This blows my mind as well Journey. But I don't think it's exclusive to POIS. My experience with the healthcare system here in Norway is that when you present symptoms that a doctor hasn't learned about in school, his/her reaction will be one of the following:
  • Denial
  • Claiming it's imagined or ultimately a psychological issue
  • Showing empathy but not actually doing the research and learning required to help you
Our local healthcare system, and I believe this goes for most countries and even the state of medical research in general, has a massive blind spot when it comes to chronic disorders. And the healthcare system (here at least) is not set up in such a way that doctors can take time out to read up on recent research in order to help an individual patient. IMO it's probably hard for doctors to accept and acknowledge that they are out of their depth and cannot help a patient. Easier to blame the symptoms on hypochondria or other mental problems.

^This 100%

I found this stuff on this very good scientific research website about autism: https://epiphanyasd.blogspot.com/

"Science and medicine are not the same. Medicine applies drugs that are shown effective in large clinical trials on people with the same biological disorder.  This is evidence-based medicine.  Where a disorder exists with multiple causes, medicine struggles to cope. Many illnesses have multiple causes, or unknown causes, for example dementia, depression, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis etc. and even conditions outside the brain like chronic prostatitis.

Medicine has many poorly effective drugs for neurological conditions. There are drugs for dementia, ALS (motor neuron disease), Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, Schizophrenia, Bipolar etc., but they are not curative - they are better than nothing, but sometimes not by much. Drugs for autism should be seen in this perspective; generally they will be partially effective and only in specific people with the same particular biological dysfunction. Drugs for ALS, Alzheimer’s etc. currently just treat some features of the disease, they do not address the cause; some of these features are shared by others brain disorders. So using an ALS drug to treat autism or schizophrenia is not a crazy idea, if the same biological features are present."