Poll

At what time interval do you feel a little better?

12 pm - 3 pm
0 (0%)
3 pm - 6 pm
0 (0%)
6 pm - 9 pm
5 (21.7%)
9 pm - 12 am
7 (30.4%)
12 am - 3 am
3 (13%)
3 am - 6 am
0 (0%)
6 am - 9 am
1 (4.3%)
9 am - 12 pm
2 (8.7%)
The time of day doesn't affect my POIS
3 (13%)
I don't know, I never paid attention to it.
2 (8.7%)

Total Members Voted: 23

Author Topic: Time of day and POIS  (Read 1048 times)

Muon

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« Last Edit: September 14, 2020, 08:38:25 AM by Muon »

Journey

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Re: Time of day and POIS
« Reply #1 on: September 14, 2020, 07:32:36 AM »
I feel as POIS is less in night and Oing before sleep give bit less.

Iwillbeatthis

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Re: Time of day and POIS
« Reply #2 on: September 14, 2020, 06:58:32 PM »
Always feel best at 9pm-12am, like I mean really good its a shame I don't feel the same in the mornings. I have recently bought some blue light blocking glasses off amazon and they do seem to increase wellbeing quite a bit, also my face looks a lot better after wearing them and the skin on my face looks much more healthy and brighter, eye bags go away. Also wake up feeling more refreshed.

Muon

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Re: Time of day and POIS
« Reply #3 on: September 15, 2020, 08:51:09 AM »
I feel significantly better as a function of time (12 a.m - 3 a.m) when I'm approaching 3 a.m just like my brother. I get more energy, feel that I'm less inflamed and being less sensitive to triggers. I also get the impression that it (some circadian parameter) synergizes with a drop in ambient temperature at nightfall. I wish this effect was present during daytime rather than at night. There were some russians a while ago discussing about sleep deprivation being beneficial to their symptoms. I don't think it is that, it probably has to do with experiencing a rise in melatonin.

certainlypois2

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Re: Time of day and POIS
« Reply #4 on: September 15, 2020, 11:38:17 PM »
I used to feel worse at night, but that doesn't happen anymore.

Muon

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Re: Time of day and POIS
« Reply #5 on: September 25, 2020, 07:26:05 AM »
« Last Edit: September 25, 2020, 07:34:51 AM by Muon »

Muon

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Re: Time of day and POIS
« Reply #6 on: January 12, 2021, 11:22:44 PM »
https://selfhacked.com/blog/th17/

Th17 cells seem to have a circadian rhythm. The amount of Th17 cells changes during the day-night cycle. Animal studies suggest that the production of Th17 is higher at midnight than at noon

Based mostly on animal findings, Th17 appears to have a protective role in combating fungi

an-y-more

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Re: Time of day and POIS
« Reply #7 on: January 14, 2021, 06:58:27 PM »
I'm not sure about better but I do enjoy nightitme more for some reason. And my daytime regime in these years was always slipping to night much easier than other way around.
 During a summer I used to stay up at night and sleep during a day usually and it was pretty common that in the morning (vaguely around 7 o clock) I would start to feel shaky like I had tremor or some tension problems. This wasn't fatigue or anything like that. Seems about a time melatonin drops at your graph..

Muon

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Re: Time of day and POIS
« Reply #8 on: March 17, 2021, 06:40:47 AM »

Muon

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Re: Time of day and POIS
« Reply #9 on: March 17, 2021, 07:08:48 AM »
* Sex 1-2h before sleep only, not during day

Yes same, it's better to get sexual activity before bed time rather than during the day. My wellbeing seems to correlate with the melatonin curve. The rare events I had where an O led to zero POIS symptoms where actually at night time. Circadian rythm (Nor)epinephrine decreases during evening/night. Regarding the DA-->NE conversion and perhaps low levels of DA and/or NE, you would think POIS would be worse at night time. Or the latter is actually a factor but melatonin somehow dominates.

A few posts back about the melatonin receptors-->they both inhibit adenylyl cyclase. Nanna's theory is centered at the inhibition of adenylyl cyclase.

Melatonin attenuates VEGF levels. The latter increases blood brain barrier permeability and vascular endothelial permeability. Also Melatonin inhibits mast cells and modulates Th1/Th2 balance.

Guanylyl cyclase?
« Last Edit: March 17, 2021, 03:16:21 PM by Muon »