Post Orgasmic Illness Syndrome (P.O.I.S.)
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September 21, 2019, 12:47:07 PM

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+  Post Orgasmic Illness Syndrome (P.O.I.S.)
|-+  POIS Cause/Treatment Discussions
| |-+  Hormonal Causes and Treatments
| | |-+  Low cortisole
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: Low cortisole  ( 1409 )
BoneBroth
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« #30 : September 13, 2019, 08:50:25 AM »

BoneBroth, thank you very much for the insights on cortisol, I find them very intriguing. Would you agree with the following statement:
"After ejaculation, normal people have their cortisol go up, while for us, it goes unfortunately DOWN." Did I understand you correctly - you would agree with this statement and you would say that cortisol helps brings the body to normal state.

I always recall an instance when, during serious POIS, I saw a few kids in a village bringing a horse. I joked and asked if they would let me ride the horse. Surprisingly, they agreed. I did some horse riding, first time in my life, not properly, with kids overseeing me. Lots of stress. And my POIS cycle stopped (it was supposed to stop in a few more days). Would you explain this anecdote by saying that cortisol level raised and managed the orgasm-induced inflammation?

Finally, did you find the posts you were referring to? I am working on understanding cortisol and POIS.

Do we have some proof that cortisol go down after ejaculation? Do anyone have any testresults of this? If so, I would say that cortisol IS needed after ejaculation (perhaps more for POISers then others) and the little that is still in store in the adrenals is consumed quickly.

Well your anecdote kind of condradicts the first statement. If you don't have enought of cortisol it could not raise much.

Nope, havn't found that post yet, but I remember that the point was that cortisol causes POIS, but that migh be a misunderstanding by the user who wrote it.
« : September 13, 2019, 03:50:29 PM BoneBroth »

Frequency analysis techniques (like QRMA) has been invaluable in the evaluation of my body's condition and treatment. It's freaking Star Trek man! Make a test and put your results here if If you can!
Investigator
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« #31 : September 14, 2019, 03:04:31 AM »

No, it would be hard to test how and if cortisol goes up or down for us. Even if one of us checks cortisol  right before and right after orgasm, and if we we notice it goes up, maybe it doesn't go up sufficiently. Let's say it goes up right as much as it does for healthy people. Then maybe it doesn't go up at the right time - 10 seconds, or 1 minute, or 10 minutes after orgasm? No way to test this on our own, this can only be examined in a lab in a controlled experiment. This can be tested if for a healthy reference group and for us, cortisol is measure before O, as well as specific times after O: a few seconds, a few minutes, one hour later, one day later, two days later. My speculation is that for us, it doesn't go up as it should be (or at least not enough up).

No, the horse anecdote doesn't contradict - rather supports - the speculation that we POISers don't get enough cortisol after ejaculation. I am not saying that we are incapable of producing cortisol whatsoever. In fact, my POIS that week would be due to low cortisol, but then the horse ride triggered its release, hence the quick recovery with the horse ride.

I am not saying cortisol is the route cause. I am only saying that cortisol is involved.

The reason I am thinking about cortisol is that I am analyzing the mercury toxicity hypothesis proposed on this forum. I've read that after physical exercise, mercury toxic people have cortisol levels go down while healthy people have them go up, and , as a result, mercury toxic people have fatigue after more intense physical exercise. I view orgasm and physical exercise in parallel here, since I get POIS symptoms also after more intense physical activity.
BoneBroth
Jr. Member
**
: 89


« #32 : September 18, 2019, 10:50:45 AM »

Yes I agree it would be difficult to make a complete "cortisol curve" minutes and hours after O. However low cortisol is assosiated with low adremal function, and there is many ways to test that condition. One test you can even do at home for free - The Ragland's sign or blood pressure test. You will need a blood pressure kit. Take your blood pressure while sitting, then stand up and take your blood pressure again. The top number, (systolic) should have gone up by 8 to 10 mm. If this number dropped instead of rising, you more than likely have adrenal fatigue. My blood pressue was falling upon standing. Try it and post it!

Frequency analysis techniques (like QRMA) has been invaluable in the evaluation of my body's condition and treatment. It's freaking Star Trek man! Make a test and put your results here if If you can!
Investigator
Newbie
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« #33 : September 18, 2019, 03:42:32 PM »

I've done in fact an "ECG stress test" - it's like the standard ECG but performed as I walk along a treadmill. I start from rest, then the treadmill starts moving, then the incline increases (HR as well), more and more, and, finally, they measure how fast I recover and go back down to normal HR as I am in rest. The test, the cardiologist said, was completely normal for me.

But I think the problem with cortisol not going the right direction would occur only after intense rather than moderate physical exercise. Based on this, I would expect the chair experiment to turn out normal.
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