Author Topic: Anyone here has high progesterone levels?  (Read 4025 times)

takedrugstoletgo

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Anyone here has high progesterone levels?
« on: December 01, 2020, 03:28:15 PM »
Im a female so my progesterone naturally fluctates, but i notice during the 2 weeks that my progesterone rises i feel almost constant POIS with flu-like symptoms and fatigue. When my period starts and the 2 weeks before ovulation i feel pretty much normal with no flu symptoms and energy is pretty good most of the time.

Does anyone here know their progesterone levels? Are they high aswell?

Muon

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Re: Anyone here has high progesterone levels?
« Reply #1 on: December 10, 2020, 08:30:52 AM »
I have never measured progesterone, idk. You could set up a poll for this in the poll category.

Investigator

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Re: Anyone here has high progesterone levels?
« Reply #2 on: December 14, 2020, 04:09:47 AM »
Yes, I had elevated 17-alpha-OH-progesterone, https://poiscenter.com/forums/index.php?topic=2532.msg21915#msg21915.

I tested in a lab in a hospital and on the form with results, I looked and it said it was elevated. But then I haven't found anyone who would interpret this. I spoke with a few endocrinologists, they would say "Oh, you're not even supposed to measure this, we monitor it only for women." Another one said that that yes, it would make sense to measure it for a man as well, but he has no experience with the meaning of a value higher than the lab norm. So, I never figured out the significance of that.

Journey

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Re: Anyone here has high progesterone levels?
« Reply #3 on: December 14, 2020, 06:10:34 AM »
Yes, I had elevated 17-alpha-OH-progesterone, https://poiscenter.com/forums/index.php?topic=2532.msg21915#msg21915.

I tested in a lab in a hospital and on the form with results, I looked and it said it was elevated. But then I haven't found anyone who would interpret this. I spoke with a few endocrinologists, they would say "Oh, you're not even supposed to measure this, we monitor it only for women." Another one said that that yes, it would make sense to measure it for a man as well, but he has no experience with the meaning of a value higher than the lab norm. So, I never figured out the significance of that.
What are your DHEA, Estrogen, Cortisol, Prolactin, Thyroid, Testosterone, SHBG, Albumin levels like?

Investigator

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Re: Anyone here has high progesterone levels?
« Reply #4 on: December 14, 2020, 08:15:38 AM »
What are your DHEA, Estrogen, Cortisol, Prolactin, Thyroid, Testosterone, SHBG, Albumin levels like?

All normal.

Journey

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Re: Anyone here has high progesterone levels?
« Reply #5 on: December 14, 2020, 08:42:56 AM »
What are your DHEA, Estrogen, Cortisol, Prolactin, Thyroid, Testosterone, SHBG, Albumin levels like?

All normal.
State exact numbers please.

Muon

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Re: Anyone here has high progesterone levels?
« Reply #6 on: February 05, 2024, 07:43:40 AM »
I have never measured progesterone, idk. You could set up a poll for this in the poll category.
Yes it's elevated.

Recent paper:
Clinical characteristics, allergic response to autologous semen, and desensitization in patients with postorgasmic illness syndrome

Paper specific discussion thread

Hormone abnormalities in 7 out of 13 patients:

High Progesterone (4/13)
Elevated Prolactin (2/13)
Low Testosterone (2/13)
Reduced Estradiol (1/13)

there may be a link between your low cholesterol and your high 17alpha-hydroxyprogesterone, since cholesterol is at the beginning of the pathway the leads, among other things, to 17alpha-OH-progesterone ( see at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/17%CE%B1-Hydroxyprogesterone, the biochemistry chart).

At least one other user, Crushgrapes, has reported high 17-OHP .  See his post at http://poiscenter.com/forums/index.php?topic=17.msg21127#msg21127 , and also his many other lab results at http://poiscenter.com/forums/index.php?topic=2434.msg20546#msg20546.   There are for sure more than one type of POIS, but you are at least two POIS sufferers that has a high 17-OHP level. 

It could be interesting to see of other members has that as well.
« Last Edit: February 05, 2024, 08:11:25 AM by Muon »

Progecitor

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Re: Anyone here has high progesterone levels?
« Reply #7 on: February 05, 2024, 12:32:41 PM »
I have never measured progesterone, idk. You could set up a poll for this in the poll category.
Yes it's elevated.

Recent paper:
Clinical characteristics, allergic response to autologous semen, and desensitization in patients with postorgasmic illness syndrome

Paper specific discussion thread

Hormone abnormalities in 7 out of 13 patients:

High Progesterone (4/13)
Elevated Prolactin (2/13)
Low Testosterone (2/13)
Reduced Estradiol (1/13)

there may be a link between your low cholesterol and your high 17alpha-hydroxyprogesterone, since cholesterol is at the beginning of the pathway the leads, among other things, to 17alpha-OH-progesterone ( see at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/17%CE%B1-Hydroxyprogesterone, the biochemistry chart).

At least one other user, Crushgrapes, has reported high 17-OHP .  See his post at http://poiscenter.com/forums/index.php?topic=17.msg21127#msg21127 , and also his many other lab results at http://poiscenter.com/forums/index.php?topic=2434.msg20546#msg20546.   There are for sure more than one type of POIS, but you are at least two POIS sufferers that has a high 17-OHP level. 

It could be interesting to see of other members has that as well.

NOX enzymes are the main producers of ROS. NOX5 could be overactivated in POIS and progesterone may have a role in this.

Low levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and calcium are necessary for sperm function. NADPH oxidase 5 (NOX5) is a membrane enzyme which produces ROS. We investigated the importance of NOX5 and an important calcium channel (CatSper) on sperm function.
NOX5 enzyme activity is not important in unstimulated sperm motility, acrosome reaction, and sperm viability. The role of this enzyme is prominent when the sperm is stimulated by progesterone.
Progesterone induces calcium entry into the human sperm through the CatSper channel.
Calcium has a main role in sperm motility and acrosome reaction (AR). Furthermore, calcium is a key activator of the NOX5 enzyme.
Mitochondria and also membrane NADPH oxidase (NOX) are main candidates as the source of ROS in the human sperm.
None of the NOX 1–4 enzymes has been identified in the human sperm. The only known NOX enzyme that is detected in the human sperm is called NOX5.
By doing so, progesterone controls several functions of the human sperm that are associated with an increase in the intracellular calcium such as motility and AR.
Overall, progesterone is one of the most important stimulators of the human sperm. For instance, progesterone induces calcium entry into the human sperm through the CatSper channel and calcium is the main activator of the NOX5 enzyme.
It has been clearly demonstrated that progesterone controls almost all aspects of human sperm function. There are several reports that have shown that progesterone can induce sperm hyperactivation. Nevertheless, some studies have shown that even increasing the concentration of progesterone from 1 nM to 10 uM could not induce sperm hyperactivation. On the other hand, it has been proven by several studies that progesterone stimulates calcium influx into the spermatozoa through the CatSper channel.
CatSper channel affects sperm motility either directly or indirectly. For instance, it can be assumed that calcium stimulates NOX5 activity and ROS generation. Calcium and ROS can stimulate the signaling pathways that are involved in sperm motility. Therefore, we conclude that probably the actions of CatSper and NOX5 are somewhat linked together.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5775990/

By the way a nice video of sperm hyperactivation by progesterone.
https://www.science.org.au/curious/video/hyperactive-sperm

An overabundance of arachidonic acid and ROS would lead to lipid peroxidation.


Continuous progesterone (P4) application will result in a considerable accumulation of arachidonic acid (AA) in the outer leaflet of the sperm plasma membrane, which would ultimately lead to CatSper desensitization. However, prolonged P4 exposure does not cause CatSper desensitization. It is possible then, that during exposure to P4, liberated AA diffuses into the inner membrane leaflet or is released into the extracellular medium. Indeed, under our experimental conditions, any compound released from the plasma membrane will be removed by continuous perfusion. It is possible that AA removal from the outer leaflet in vivo could be achieved by either fatty acid transporters or chelation by albumin, which is abundant in the female reproductive tract.

The cause is probably the senescence of sexual organs and resultant inducible SASP, which also acts as a kind of non-diabetic metabolic syndrome.