Author Topic: New ideas about POIS and review of excitotoxicity  (Read 11601 times)

trusttheprocess

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Re: New ideas about POIS and review of excitotoxicity
« Reply #30 on: April 28, 2017, 10:44:17 PM »
Yes. I think candida affects alot of people without them knowing it. There's even an Italian MD that says candida is the cause of cancer. Now, I just saw on the news that there's a new form of candida from China called Candida Auris that can KILL you! Shits crazy. I ate a ton of sugar all my life. My intestines are probably loaded with fungus. Also, I get POIS symptoms when I take herbs and supplements that kill candida. Maybe POIS is actually candida die off.

Things I take to kill candida...

raw garlic
Niacinamide
Raw coconut oil
Olive leaf xtrct
Grapefruit seed xtrct
Eat no sugar diet.

Everyone on here should try it and see if it affects POIS in any way and report back here.
Thanks!!!!

Yeah I agree with that you it's crazy, that most doctors around the world ignore a fungus that can cause autoimmune disease, cancer, and even kill you is absolutely insane.

When I was at my endocrinologist on Wednesday, I brought that candida quiz that I linked to (in this thread), which said I almost certainly had it.  I told him that, and said the quiz had just about every single serious health symptom I was experiencing, and tried to hand the list to him.  As I held the papers out, he said he didn't want to look at them because as far as he was concerned, it was "bogus".

Then he went on and tried convince me I wasn't there for the symptoms I had repeatedly told him about, but had actually come to him for frequent urination, something which I never even wanted him to treat.  He just forced that upon me because he thought that was the most serious symptom, even though I listed at least five other more serious symptoms.

Needless to say, I was out of that office in five minutes and will never be going back to that guy.  This was my first time trying to seek professional help for POIS, and 6 months, 2 appointments, and a few hundred dollars thrown out the window later, I probably will never be trying that again.  Glad I listened to everyone's advice on this forum and tried to figure out POIS myself, trying to get help for POIS from that guy probably would've required dozens of tests and thousands of dollars.

I'd much rather try to treat Candida naturally anyway, so I just ordered three new supplements, and plan on trying these.  I have no clue what effects these will have, and ever since I started taking OLE andrographis and resveratrol my symptoms have gotten worse, not sure if I'm just stressed out about finals or if they're giving me side effects, so don't take any of these but I'll let you guys know how much they help.

http://www.iherb.com/Wakunaga-Kyolic-Kyolic-Formula-102-Candida-Cleanse-Digestion-100-Veggie-Tablets/56189
(Kyolic Formula 102 herb & enzyme blend, contains a unique, natural and synergistic combination of Aged Garlic Extract, Ginger, Glucanase, Lipase and Protease)

http://www.iherb.com/Now-Foods-Candida-Support-90-Veggie-Caps/462
(Candida Support is a combination of traditional herbal ingredients (Pau D'Arco, Black Walnut and Oregano Oil), Biotin (a B-complex vitamin) and Caprylic Acid (a naturally occurring fatty acid derived from plant oils)

http://www.iherb.com/Nature-s-Sources-Kolorex-Advanced-Candida-Care-60-Softgels/6634
(Kolorex Advanced Candida Care helps maintain balanced intestinal micro-flora, using a patented extract of New Zealand RedLeaf Horopito.)

Along with VagSmashers suggestions
Raw Coconut oil
Olive Leaf Extract
No sugar diet

And a few of mine
Andrographis
Resveratrol
Probiotics
« Last Edit: April 29, 2017, 03:20:04 AM by trusttheprocess »

trusttheprocess

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Re: New ideas about POIS and review of excitotoxicity
« Reply #31 on: May 04, 2017, 01:32:04 AM »
Found a better quiz for diagnosing Candida:  http://www.wholeapproach.com/candida/questionnaire.php

This link was in an article about histamine intolerance, the author of the article said they "scored a whopping 200 points!"

I scored 395.

This is very troubling as the author was a woman, and I should be less susceptible to Candidiasis for the following reasons:
(from http://thehistamineintolerantchick.blogspot.com/2013/08/coulld-candida-albicans-be-causing-your.html)
  • "C. albicans growth is stimulated by the female hormone progesterone. Its levels are elevated during pregnancy and in the second half of each menstrual cycle. Synthetic progestins are found in oral contraceptives and also contribute to candida overgrowth."
  • "Female hormonal levels are constantly fluctuating and sustained high levels of estrogen can occur. This condition tends to impair immune system function."
  • "The female anatomy lends itself to the ready migration of C. albicans...yeast infections are a common result."
Why did I score so highly on the quiz then?  Without getting into the genetic factors behind this, I can think of two reasons.
  • Candida triples histamine levels in people with asthma (asthma runs in my family, from study "Concentration of LTC4 and Histamine in Serum and IgG Against Candida albicans")
  • Some people are allergic to Candida, results in a 20% higher histamine level on average when it's put on the skin (allergies run in my family, from study "HRA: Production by Mitogen or Antigen-Stimulated Human Mononuclear Cells")
Below is a good explanation of the link between histamine and candida, and some effective ways to treat Candida.
Quote
"Research shows that Candida triggers histamine release, but did you know you can be allergic to candida, causing repeated, longer lasting or more intense infections? Or that those with chronic candida are 70% more likely to have a history of family allergies and allergic rhinitis? There?s really exciting news though ? Tufts researchers have made a discovery that will rock our world!

Will treating Candida help resolve histamine intolerance/excess histamine/mast cell activation?

Possibly.

Are there natural treatments available?

Yes! A recent study by researchers at Tufts has found that a coconut oil rich diet reduces the amount of Candida albicans in the gut by more than 90% in mice [1].

More on that below.

Before proceeding, I?m just adding a quick update on a new review published in the European Journal of Pharmacology which discusses the findings that curcumin, extracted from turmeric, may be an appropriate treatment for invasive fungal infections like candida in cancer patients [1a].

We?ll have to wait for convulsive results but I thought it worthy of a mention given the study I read in Critical Reviews in Microbiology which shared something new to me: not only does candida take advantage of the immunocompromised by increasing the risk of carcinogenesis and metastasis in those undergoing chemotherapy, but that new research indicates candida may cause cancer progression by triggering inflammation [1b].

Back to the histamine connection.

Most, if not all, bacterial, viral and fungal infections cause an immune system response which comprises the release of histamine and many other inflammatory molecules [2].

A number of studies, including one published this year (2015) in the Nature Journal show that candida infection triggers mast cells to release inflammatory mediators to try and kill off the fungus [3].

As you?ll remember, histamine is found outside of the body in foods but it?s also present in our body, where it lives in mast cells, which are a key component of our immune system. When mast cells freak out for no reason (like in mast cell activation disorder/syndrome) or need to get in there and fight a pathogen, they do their degranulation boogaloo, shaking loose a ton of inflammatory cytokines to get the healing process going.

In 2012 authors of a study published in Frontiers in Immunology concluded that mast cells could be involved in the defence against Candida albicans by releasing histamine [4]."  (https://healinghistamine.com/are-you-allergic-to-candida/)

Candida, Histamine, and Leaky gut all seemed to be linked, probably because Candida can put holes in cell walls, damaging and destroying them.  This will lead to an immune response, allergies, and mast cell activation.

"Studies show that if your gut is colonised with the fungus Candida you are likely to become sensitive against food antigens (food allergy), because of the increased number of mast cells, and the hyper permeability of the gastrointestinal mucosa (which is caused by histamine release).  If you have histamine intolerances and food allergies it is very important to test for pathogens. As a minimum they can be contributing to the histamine load if you have a histamine related disease. They could also just be the cause." (http://alisonvickery.com.au/fungal-infections-histamine-intolerance-and-mast-cells/)

These gut issues can also lead to low levels of DAO, the main factor in histamine intolerance.  A list of conditions that cause DAO deficiency is listed below:
  • Gluten intolerance
  • Leaky gut
  • SIBO
  • DAO-blocking foods: alcohol, energy drinks, and tea
  • Genetic mutations (common in people of Asian-descent)
  • Inflammation from Crohn?s, ulcerative colitis, and inflammatory bowel disease.
Or taking any of the following medications: (from (http://www.amymyersmd.com/2016/02/everything-you-need-to-know-about-histamine-intolerance/)
  • Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (ibuprofen, aspirin)
  • Antidepressants (Cymbalta, Effexor, Prozac, Zoloft)
  • Immune modulators (Humira, Enbrel, Plaquenil)
  • Antiarrhythmics (propanolol, metaprolol, Cardizem, Norvasc)
  • Antihistamines (Allegra, Zyrtec, Benadryl)
  • Histamine (H2) blockers (Tagamet, Pepcid, Zantac)
Note: Don't know if this entire list is accurate.  Tagamet did inhibit DAO by 25%, but Benedryl increased DAO by 20%, and Zyrtec and Zantac had no effect (from (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9831324?dopt=Abstract).

Other factors can raise histamine levels even more such as allergies, histamine-rich foods, and HNMT, MAO, NAT2, or MTHFR deficiency.  This explains why B vitamins help POIS, as they are required for these histamine clearing enzymes. (http://mthfr.net/histamine-intolerance-mthfr-and-methylation/2015/06/11/)
  • HNMT ? which requires SAMe as a cofactor (and this requires an effective MTHFR enzyme to help produce SAMe)
  • DAO ? which requires vitamin B6 and copper
  • MAO ? which requires vitamin B2 and iron
  • NAT2 ? which requires CoA which stems from vitamin B5
I want to talk about why Candida/Histamine are so imporant now, so if you want to know more about treating histamine intolerance, read this website (https://selfhacked.com/2014/08/01/deal-histamine/).

trusttheprocess

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Re: New ideas about POIS and review of excitotoxicity
« Reply #32 on: May 04, 2017, 05:49:54 AM »
Importance of Candida related Histamine release

High levels of histamine are not healthy, one reason for this is because it opens the blood brain barrier.  This can allow Candida, or at least the toxins it produces, into the brain.  Although the causes behind it aren't clear, Candida can cause meningitis, something that is recognized by the Meningitis Research Foundation (http://www.meningitis.org/disease-info/types-causes/fungal).  Due to the link between Candida overgrowth and Histamine intolerance, and the interaction between them just worsens symptoms until a diet that doesn't feed Candida is adopted.

Overview of Fungal Meningitis (Gottfredsson, Magn?s, and John Perfect. "Fungal Meningitis.")

"Fungal infections have increased in incidence. This increase is attributed to an enlarging population of high-risk immunosuppressed patients, which is due in part to more successful pharmacological immunosuppression and chemotherapies and the frequent use of antibacterial and antiviral therapies. In addition, large numbers of patients living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) develop life-threatening fungal infections during the course of their illness. As a result of these trends, central nervous system (CNS) infections caused by opportunistic fungal pathogens are becoming increasingly relevant. In addition, seemingly immunocompetent individuals can acquire these CNS infections with fungi.

In the majority of cases the fungus appears to seed the CNS hematogeneously, usually from a pulmonary focus of infection but occasionally from extracranial sites such as infective endocarditis. Direct extension of fungal infections involving the cranial bones or sinuses into the subarachnoid space has also been described, usually causing basal meningitis or mass lesions. For clinicians, the varied clinical presentations of fungal meningitis and its possible concomitant brain parenchymal involvement constitute a major diagnostic challenge, because the yield of traditional diagnostic methods, such as culture, may not routinely be positive. Moreover, as more potential treatment options for these CNS infections become available, a timely and accurate diagnosis is crucial to improve prognosis for these seriously ill patients. In this review, we examine the topic of fungal infections of the meninges in both a general and a fungus-specific format...

The brain and the subarachnoid space are considered immunologically sequestered sites. The subarachnoid space has anatomic and functional barriers that exclude or modify immune responses. Except for the apparent neurotropism of C. neoformans, it remains unclear why this fungus uniquely invades this privileged sanctuary and what factors possessed by the fungus allow it to do so. On the other hand, although some patients with fungal meningitis have no overt immune defect or underlying disease, most patients with this infection have some predisposing factors or immune abnormalities that allow invasion by these low-virulent pathogens.

Certain clinical conditions have been identified that lead to failure of these host defenses. For example, direct inoculation of fungi into the brain following head injuries or neurosurgical procedures is an easily defined pathological mechanism. However, there can be subtle local immune cell dysregulation that allows establishment of meningitis; for instance, development of suppressor T cells in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has been observed in a case of Histoplasma meningitis.   Even potent antibacterial regimens may be a contributing factor to Candida meningitis. Corticosteroid treatment is a risk factor for fungal meningitis, and C. neoformans is the most prominent fungus complicating corticosteroid use.  The host immune responses and underlying disease are not only the major factors in the pathogenesis of these infections but also the most significant determinants of outcome in the patients.

All types of invasive infections with C. albicans and other Candida species are increasing in prevalence. The clinical symptoms of Candida meningitis are highly variable and can range from acute to chronic in nature, with headache and fever the most common clinical manifestations. In patients with Candida meningitis without concomitant HIV infection, [neck] rigidity is also commonly detected.  Almost all of these patients have also received broad-spectrum antibacterial agents and in some reports have had an antecedent bacterial meningitis.  In rare circumstances, Candida species can invade the subarachnoid spaces from the sinuses and the adjacent bone.  This is generally associated with an anatomic defect. Intracranial extension of the Candida infection can lead to arteritis within the CNS and subarachnoidal hemorrhage.

All Candida meningitis cases should be aggressively treated. The mortality for Candida meningitis with treatment has been reduced to 10 to 20%. The combination of amphotericin B and flucytosine is attractive as the regimen of choice because this combination has synergistic activity against Candida in vitro and flucytosine immediately reaches high concentrations in the CSF. Clinical experience suggests that this combination provides an excellent cure rate."

Pathology of fungal meningitis (S?nchez?Portocarrero, Jorge, et al. "The Central Nervous System and Infection by Candida Species.")

"When the CNS is involved in patients with systemic candidiasis, several clinical manifestations can be overlooked due to the severity of the patient?s situation. The decrease in the level of consciousness is the most frequent manifestation of CNS candidiasis. Often, not much attention is given to this manifestation when we come across septic patients suffering from severe illnesses in intensive care units, patients undergoing invasive procedures or sedated on drugs. Studies of the brain of patients who died from systemic candidiasis have concluded that up to 50% had CNS invasion by Candida species.  However, these patients were rarely diagnosed when alive because of the lack of clinical manifestations.

Recently, Candida species have been considered to be responsible for other neurologic clinical manifestations besides decreasing the level of consciousness. We therefore think that it is necessary to review the full and constantly changing spectrum of neurologic pathology caused by this microorganism.  The physiopathology of Candida CNS involvement varies according to the clinical setting. When systemic candidiasis is prolonged, it can affect the CNS and induce diffuse encephalopathy with diminished consciousness in which the predominant lesions are microabscesses. These have been reproduced experimentally by introducing C. albicans into the internal carotid of rats, thus simulating candidemia.

Pathologic findings are many. Microabscesses are usually found in the joint between the gray and white matters and they are widely spread in the CNS, being the basal ganglia and the cerebellum the sites more frequently involved.  Other findings are macroabscesses and lesions of vascular origin such as cerebral infarcts by vasculitis or mycotic aneurysms.  Up to 23% of patients with CNS candidiasis in necropsy studies may have evidence of vascular invasion, either in the vascular wall itself or with invasion of the arterial lumen. When cerebral ischemic damage exists, the infarcts are usually found in the basal ganglia. Old vascular lesions such as operated subdural hematoma can be infected by Candida species (Lipton et al., 1984). In general, these vascular complications seem to have a less important clinical role, although invasion of the arteries at the base of the brain by the fungus can produce transitory or permanent neurologic deficits.  Microabscesses cannot generally be seen on the cranial CT scan. They can be observed using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, where they are seen as small enhanced ring lesions with a hemorrhagic component and widely spread in the brain."



Quantum

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Re: New ideas about POIS and review of excitotoxicity
« Reply #33 on: May 04, 2017, 06:53:23 AM »
Hi TTP,

Have added yet coconut oil and curcumin to your diet, the proposed natural cure for candida proposed in one of your references ?

I note that having a healthy diet and incorporating healthy food has many advantages, beyond what we may be aware of.   I say that because I already have turmeric/curcumin incorporated in my daily diet for at least 2 years, and in January, I have started to add organic coconut oil to my green smoothies ( I like its smell and its taste !   Be aware that if the coconut oil you use do not have a coconut smell, it has been tempered with and is not as healthy).

DAO has been discussed as a solution.  A member seemed to have some good initial results, but we did not have any news after.  One other member reported no effect with DAO.  But we already no that no one product works for every POIS sufferer.
You are 100% responsible for what you do with anything I post on this forum and of any consequence it could have for you.  Forum rule: ""Do not use POISCenter as a substitute for, or to give, medical advice" Read the remaining part at http://poiscenter.com/forums/index.php?topic=1.msg10259#msg10259

trusttheprocess

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Re: New ideas about POIS and review of excitotoxicity
« Reply #34 on: May 04, 2017, 12:13:20 PM »
Quantum,

I haven't added coconut oil to my diet yet, although I plan on doing that sometime this weekend. 

Curcumin I have been using for a long time as the main anti-inflammatory for me during POIS.  I used to use Aspirin, but I have always mixed many different supplements and I didn't want to risk stomach or liver damage.  The health benefits of curcumin are staggering, I think it belongs in the "elite" tier of supplements with the most benefits, along with green tea and fish oil.  Check out these 37 proven health benefits if you don't believe me: https://selfhacked.com/2016/03/14/curcumin-cures-top-15-scientifically-proven-health-benefits-with-references/

I agree with you that healthy diets are very important, cutting out dairy, MSG, aspartame and most gluten and sugar has helped me tremendously.  I'm not an expert on healthy foods so I've mainly just tried to start eating organic salads with vegetables mixed in.  Also was eating blueberries for a while, they are excellent at reducing neuro-inflammation. 

I've never tried DAO but have always wanted to.  As I mentioned in my post, low DAO it is the main risk factor in elevated histamine but many other things can cause it including candida.  I would think a healthy diet would work better than DAO because it treats the cause of the elevated histamine, the candida, and not just the body's response to it.

Mr Raba

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Re: New ideas about POIS and review of excitotoxicity
« Reply #35 on: May 04, 2017, 02:24:36 PM »
TTP,

I have both CFS and POIS.  Latest studies have found a state of induced hypometabolic state such as in sepsis with CFS. Also remarkable findings in the pathways you describe.

I do not know if you are aware of the latest CFS research which is now a breakthrough after a breakthrough.

I strongly encourage you to look at several excellent articles regarding energy impairment and compensations ocurring to bring homeostasis in this excellent blog site:  Health Rising.  Here is one such article that discusses calcium channels involvement. Look at older posts in same blog  for a literal gold mine of info on inflammation and energy pathways.

https://www.healthrising.org/blog/2017/02/28/biomarker-aussies-chronic-fatigue-syndrome/

Simultaneous onset of CFS and POIS since Feb 1993. 
Married since 1989.

Helped by Immunocal (I explained how to take in previous posts).  Significant relief day one and day two.  It affects neurotransmitters!

VagSmasher

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Re: New ideas about POIS and review of excitotoxicity
« Reply #36 on: May 06, 2017, 11:43:12 AM »
Yes. I've long believed that POIS is caused by High brain histamine. Histamine is the neurotransmitter that makes you orgasm. The higher your brain histamine, the quicker you orgasm. That's why so many of us have Nocturnal emissions and Premature ejaculations.

Candida increases histamine which can increase POIS. Intense exercise also increases histamine. So does STRESS and ANXIETY. (Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone and Brain Mast Cells Regulate Blood-Brain-Barrier Permeability Induced by Acute Stress causing even more histamine to get into the brain!!!)

Not only does high histamine increase orgasm, but orgasm increases histamine. It's a never ending cycle. Maybe our H3 receptors aren't working? ( they work to control histamine like an automatic feedback loop)

The Diencephalon part of the brain is our emotional center. It is surrounded by mast cell. The mast cell release histamine into Diencephalon causing emotional sensitivity, anxiety, autism, brain fog, and Pois??...
« Last Edit: May 06, 2017, 12:18:08 PM by VagSmasher »
Symptoms: Brain Fog, Frustration, stuffed nose, anger, anxiety, and feel zoned out.

ThisType

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Re: New ideas about POIS and review of excitotoxicity
« Reply #37 on: May 07, 2017, 07:56:02 AM »
VagSmasher, that's an interesting theory.  I have a benign pineal cyst seen via MRI.  The Diencephalon (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diencephalon) includes the pineal gland (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pineal_gland).  I see the cluster 1 symptoms of POIS (speech, brain fog, etc) per (http://tau.amegroups.com/article/view/11107/11778).

demografx

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Re: New ideas about POIS and review of excitotoxicity
« Reply #38 on: May 07, 2017, 02:36:13 PM »
Interesting, TT.
Usually have major POIS-reduction, treatment consisting of daily (365 days/year) testosterone patches.

TRT must be checked out carefully with your doctor due to fertility, cardiac and other risks associated with it.

40+ years of severe 4-days-POIS, married, raised a family, started/ran a business.

Going less Crazy

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Re: New ideas about POIS and review of excitotoxicity
« Reply #39 on: May 08, 2017, 05:05:03 AM »
Hmm maybe that's why vitamin c has helped me, antihistamine?

I didn't read too much but candida could be a possibility by paving the way for food sensitivities, Intolerance/auto immune issues causing high histamine and other inflammatory issues.  Im not sure if "curing candida" would resolve this issue once your immune system has tagged food a foreign invader.
« Last Edit: May 08, 2017, 05:09:03 AM by Going less Crazy »
My POIS 100% managed with modified Paleo Diet (@ diet that 100% manages my pois)Believe my POIS stems from inflammation in the gut. O and stimulation = neuro POIS from inflammation from the gut. Can O freely. Current supplements: tolerase g, ground ginger (microdosing)

Pois 2011

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Re: New ideas about POIS and review of excitotoxicity
« Reply #40 on: May 08, 2017, 10:17:10 AM »
I dont believe in the Candia theorie. I made the candida test as well and scored like 265 or something. But then again I dont have any lose stool problems, constipation, white coating on tongue , bowel movement, which should be the main symptoms for candida. I asked 2 doctors about it and both reacted pretty much the same. They said candida is something almost esoteric like. If you go to to a nutritionist and you make a candida test they will always tell you that you have overgrowth. Candida would be all around us and there are people with a very bad immune system who have problems with it but you would see that directly on skin etc that they have problems with it.  At least I dont think i have such a problem. I was on a Candida diet and was very strict and later I ate a lot of sugar - it didnt change a thing. What had an influence on me as far as I believe was when I started eating prossessed sweets again - but here I blame the other ingriedients. White sugar seems to be fine to me...

Regarding Vitamin C I tried the vitamin C Flush a couple of times and felt very good affterwards. Read about it here: http://www.beyondhealthnews.com/wpnews/index.php/2012/08/the-vitamin-c-flush-a-critical-weapon-in-the-fight-for-health/
but it wont heal Pois. Maybe it could give you some further relieve.

VagSmasher

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Re: New ideas about POIS and review of excitotoxicity
« Reply #41 on: May 09, 2017, 05:51:37 PM »
I dont believe in the Candia theorie. I made the candida test as well and scored like 265 or something. But then again I dont have any lose stool problems, constipation, white coating on tongue , bowel movement, which should be the main symptoms for candida. I asked 2 doctors about it and both reacted pretty much the same. They said candida is something almost esoteric like. If you go to to a nutritionist and you make a candida test they will always tell you that you have overgrowth. Candida would be all around us and there are people with a very bad immune system who have problems with it but you would see that directly on skin etc that they have problems with it.  At least I dont think i have such a problem. I was on a Candida diet and was very strict and later I ate a lot of sugar - it didnt change a thing. What had an influence on me as far as I believe was when I started eating prossessed sweets again - but here I blame the other ingriedients. White sugar seems to be fine to me...

Regarding Vitamin C I tried the vitamin C Flush a couple of times and felt very good affterwards. Read about it here: http://www.beyondhealthnews.com/wpnews/index.php/2012/08/the-vitamin-c-flush-a-critical-weapon-in-the-fight-for-health/
but it wont heal Pois. Maybe it could give you some further relieve.

That's because most Medical Doctors aren't taught in medical school about candida.

Below is a link to more than 61,000 scientific studies about candida...

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=candida

And if you have candida in your blood stream, it doesn't always cause gut issues.

Trust me. Candida is very very real.

Just because a doctor doesn't know about something doesn't mean it doesn't exist..
Symptoms: Brain Fog, Frustration, stuffed nose, anger, anxiety, and feel zoned out.

caveeater

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Re: New ideas about POIS and review of excitotoxicity
« Reply #42 on: May 10, 2017, 05:49:40 AM »
Candida makes sense. I certainly have it to some extent (it almost always co-incides with mercury poisoning, which I suspect I have due to having had amalgam fillings for years).

When I did a ketogenic diet, my candida was fairly under control and POIS didn't affect me as badly.

paradoxx

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Re: New ideas about POIS and review of excitotoxicity
« Reply #43 on: May 20, 2017, 05:00:06 PM »
Hi trusttheprocess, you raise some concepts about candida which seem plausible. While I find it easy to believe that candida is a common problem and involved in at least some cases of POIS, I remain sceptical about it. Earlier in my life I was really polarized towards 'natural' health practicioners while condemning academic medicine (now I guess i believe its much more complex). It was during that time (2008) when I saw an alternative practicioner for my digestive issues. His diagnosis was candida based on viewing a blood sample in a dark field microscope (http://tarahealthcentre.com.au/Services/Ev-methods/Darkfield.htm). He let me take a look through the microscope and it all seemed very plausible. As a treatment he prescribed me an antifungal rectal suppository plus a skin cream and told me to avoid certain foods for a while. As far as i can remember, my problems didn't really disappear during the next months and I stopped pursing the candida topic. Over the years, i kept stumbling over the topic every now and again like here in this thread. Until now I don't know what to think of it (the previous two posts here pretty much sum up the conflict I have in my mind) and didn't take enough time yet to understand all of what was posted about it here, but still I wanted to share these things.

Did anyone else ever get a candida diagnosis and what's your opinion on dark field microscopy (if you have one)?

trusttheprocess

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Re: New ideas about POIS and review of excitotoxicity
« Reply #44 on: June 07, 2017, 02:35:10 PM »
Hey fellow POISers,

Sorry I haven't updated you guys sooner on my results with candida supplements, I was hoping to report almost complete reduction of symptoms with it, but unfortunately it is a very slow process.  It's similar to when I took my 23andme test, discovered I had issues processing vitamins B & D, and started taking those.  Great improvement of symptoms at first, but mixed results since then. 

I'm not going to change anything, however.  Candida is a notoriously tough pathogen to get rid of, almost all cases I've read about needed multiple strong antibiotics to cure it, and the only way to convince a doctor that it could get in the nervous system is to get a cereberospinal fluid sample and do extensive tests on it.  This is because every case of candida that's been studied has varied, with some only harmlessly colonizing and others being life threatening.  This is why doctors believe it is so rare, they only consider it if someone is having life threatening encephalitis, and they must do tests are far from the normal standard of care.

There are numerous reasons why my improvement in symptoms have diminished.  I had gastrointestinal problems the first week of the supplements, but felt absolutely great.  Then, I was sick for two weeks.  The supplements definitely did not start my illness, that happened after a late night out.  When I was sick I had thrush on my tongue which is rare for me and is a sign of candida overgrowth, but I also used asthma medicine which can cause that.  I haven't been strict at all with my diet, which is slowing my recovery as sugar and alcohol feed candida.  I have also gone into POIS a few times and did not take any supplements before, which probably played a part in getting me sick and why I didn't recover sooner.  I was hoping the candida supplements would work right away, but for the reasons described above I have a feeling it will take a while.

I was hoping to get more concrete results, but I still believe those will come with time.  Also I've been very busy starting an internship doing medical research, first week I filled out a proposal to our IRB for a study.  We are doing an ex vivo study on human tissue samples, and even though there was no chance of adverse effects for the participants, there were dozens of questions asking us to anticipate the effects it could have on them and how we would handle it.  There is no way Dr. K did not foresee the potential problems with the study, but now that I have a little experience with research I think VNS provided little benefit and he didn't see any point in continuing to subject participants to POIS and publish a paper if there weren't significant results to justify continuing it.

TTP