Author Topic: Mast Cell Activation Syndrome  (Read 26960 times)

Iwillbeatthis

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Re: Mast Cell Activation Syndrome
« Reply #150 on: March 24, 2020, 09:45:08 AM »
Thanks I enjoyed the video Muon, have you tested for any MCAD mediators yourself?

Iwillbeatthis

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Re: Mast Cell Activation Syndrome
« Reply #151 on: March 26, 2020, 10:41:49 PM »
Dr Tania Dempsey the mast cell specialist in the video Muon posted said her most effective treatment for her patients was the Dynamic Neural Retraining System DNRS

I was put on this programme by my Functional Medicine doctor, I've only completed day 1 but I can already see this will greatly benefit and maybe could potentially cure POIS and other issues like MCAS, Chronic fatigue, POTS, Chemical senstiivity.

Over firing of protective mechanisms in the limbic system can cause all types of problems such as: release of stress hormones, autonomic dysfunction, inflammation, hypersensitivity, fatigue. The programme rewires the limbic system so it doesn't detect a threat after orgasm and creates new neural pathways in the brain.

They have a very high percentage of patients making a full 100% recovery from these conditions, and a lot of patients feel 80% relieved only after the 3rd day of training.

Obviously I don't think any POIS patients have tried it yet apart from me but it specifically is a cure for Chronic fatigue, Chemical sensitivty, Fibromyalgia, Chronic Lyme Disease, Food Sensitivities, Anxiety, Chronic Pain, Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome

Please do not mistake this as a thing similar to therapy, I have tried CBT, and other therapies which haven't helped my POIS and other problems at all, I have also tried mediation a lot and yoga with not much help.

I know it sounds a bit gimmicky and strange but it really does work for a lot of people.

The Dynamic Neural Retraining System™ is a natural, drug- free, neuroplasticity-based program that can assist in relieving symptoms associated with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Multiple Chemical Sensitivity, Fibromyalgia, Chronic Lyme Disease, Food Sensitivities, Anxiety, Chronic Pain, Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome and many other conditions. Many of these conditions are related to a chronic stress response and limbic system impairment.

What is different about our approach?
We directly target brain function and a maladapted stress response that is at the root of suffering for so many. We do not chase your symptoms – we teach you how to change the function and structure of your brain. When you rewire the limbic system, you move your body from a state of survival to a state of growth and repair – where true healing can take place.

millstone

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Re: Mast Cell Activation Syndrome
« Reply #152 on: March 29, 2020, 08:28:30 PM »
Dr Tania Dempsey the mast cell specialist in the video Muon posted said her most effective treatment for her patients was the Dynamic Neural Retraining System DNRS

I was put on this programme by my Functional Medicine doctor, I've only completed day 1 but I can already see this will greatly benefit and maybe could potentially cure POIS and other issues like MCAS, Chronic fatigue, POTS, Chemical senstiivity.

My functional doc also recommended this program. I've been thinking about purchasing it for two weeks now.

Your post inspired me to purchase the online course today. I am starting it tonight.

Please keep us posted on how it works for you and I will do the same!

Muon

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Re: Mast Cell Activation Syndrome
« Reply #153 on: March 30, 2020, 03:43:05 PM »
Thanks I enjoyed the video Muon, have you tested for any MCAD mediators yourself?
N-methylhistamine, PGD2, tetranor-PGDM, 11-beta-PGF2-alpha. All 24h urine. The only one that is slightly elevated is 11-beta-PGF2-alpha.

Also my elevated IL-8 (CXCL8) could come from MCs but there is no way of knowing.
IL-8 and IgG4 are both elevated. My brother IL-8 and IgE elevated. I know of these pathways:

IL-33 ---> MC activation ---> IL-8 selectively
IL-33 ---> MC activation ---> IL-13 ---> B cells ---> IgE
IL-33 ---> MC activation ---> IL-13 ---> B cells ---> IgG4

Diagnostic parameters which haven't been tested yet are Heparin, Chromogranin A and Leukotrienes. There are some other ones that are interesting but fall outside of diagnostic criteria though.

Also there are pictures of redness at the surface close to my stomach. I wonder what happens when you apply MC-specific staining on that tissue (CD117) since there are reactions to food happening especially when food enters the stomach.

If the alarmin IL-33 plays a role in MC activation then I should respond to Dexamethasone:

Dexamethasone rapidly suppresses IL‐33‐stimulated mast cell function by blocking transcription factor activity
« Last Edit: April 19, 2020, 03:29:15 PM by Muon »

Hopeoneday

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Re: Mast Cell Activation Syndrome
« Reply #154 on: April 18, 2020, 08:20:45 AM »
Hi guys, for thouse who are intrested, diagnosing of MCAS is simple :) ,
zilions posible a root couses :) , MC hawe over 200 hundreds mediators...


https://hoffmancentre.com/mast-cell-activation-syndrome-histamine-immune-system-runs-rampant/

If you’re interested in getting lab work done to check for MCAS, I recommend the tests listed below. The top five, in bold, are the most important and necessary to establish a diagnosis:

  1.  Histamine – plasma – Quest 36586 – must be chilled. Normal range – 28-51 ug/l.
  2.  N-Methylhistamine – 24-hour urine – must be chilled. Normal range – less than 200 mcg/g.
  .  Prostaglandin D2 – plasma – must be chilled. Must be off NSAIDS (Motrin, Advil), aspirin, ASA, anything containing aspirin, for 5 days.
  4.  Prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) – 24-hour urine – chilled. Must be off NSAIDS (Motrin, Advil), aspirin, ASA, anything containing aspirin, for 5 days.
  5.  Chromogranin A – Quest 16379 – must be off proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and H2 blockers (Pepcid and Zantac) for 5 days before tests, since they can falsely elevate chromogranin A.
   6. Prostaglandin 11-beta F2 Alpha (PGF2alpha) – 24-hour urine – chilled. Must be off NSAIDS (Motrin, Advil), aspirin, ASA, anything containing aspirin, for 5 days.
   7. Serum Tryptase – Quest 34484. Rarely elevated in MCAS. NR less than 11.5 ng/ml. Positive if increase over baseline of 20% or baseline greater than 15.
   8. Leukotriene E4 – 24-hour urine – chilled. Must be off NSAIDS (Motrin, Advil), aspirin, ASA, anything containing aspirin, for 5 days.
   9. Plasma heparin Anti-XA (must be off heparin products) – chilled. Degrades quickly.
  10.  Blood clotting profile – Thrombin/PT/PTT/INR.
   11. Anti-IgE Receptor antibody.
    12.Neuron Specific Enolase – Quest 34476.
    13.Plasma pheochromocytoma workup.
    14.Porphyria workup.
    15.Factor VIII deficiency.
    16.Plasma free norepinephrine – Quest 37562.
    17.Urinary metanephrines – can b done in normal Calgary labs.
    18.Immunoglobulins – IgG, IgM, IgE, IgA
    19.Bone marrow biopsy looking for the following markers: CD117/CD25; CD117/CD2.
    20.Gastrin
    21.Ferritin
    22.CBC – eosinophils, basophils.
    23.Antiphospholipid antibodies.
    24.Genetic testing looking for Phase 1 and Phase II liver detox and methylation defects.
    25.Dunwoody Labs – test zonulin, histamine, DAO enzyme deficiency.


Patients who come into my office with MCAS usually have multisystem, multisymptom inflammatory responses. These symptoms have often caused them to trudge from doctor to doctor, undergoing rounds of testing, causing them to feel extraordinarily confused as to what’s happening to their body. Because the symptoms of MCAS have so broad a reach and differ so considerably from person to person I’d like to break them down by nonspecific, general clues, and organ system signs.



Most Common General Symptoms:

    “I’ve been sick for as long as I can remember”
    “I overreact to bee stings, mosquito bites, penicillin and most medications”
    “I can’t take a full breath”
    “Whenever I stand up I get lightheaded”
    Insomnia/sleep disorders starting early in life
    Tinnitus/ringing in the ears from a young age
    Vomiting as an infant
    Abdominal pain as an infant
    Facial and chest flushing ( a red flush when embarrassed or stressed)
    Dermatographism—a red line appearing on the skin when scratched with a blunt object
    Frequent infections, cold, viruses, gut viruses as an infant, adolescent or adult
    Fatigue and malaise
    Frequent fevers
    Edema—“water” accumulation in different parts of body
    Waxing and waning of symptoms
    Food, drug, and chemical intolerances (especially fragrances). This is a very common symptom which may be exacerbated by phase 1 and phase II liver detoxification problems as identified by gene testing
    Sense of being cold all the time
    Decreased wound healing
    Hypersensitivity to much in environment, including medications
    Weight gain or loss
    Heat intolerance
    Frequent family history of cancer, especially intestinal or bone marrow (hematologic)
    Generally feeling inflamed
    Generalized lymphadenopathy (enlarged lymph nodes)

MCAS Symptoms by Organ System

Eyes – Red eyes, irritated eyes, dry eyes, burning eyes, difficulty focusing vision, and conjunctivitis (pink eye).

Nose – Nasal stuffiness, sinusitis, postnasal drip, hoarseness, laryngitis, nose bleeds (epistaxis), and intranasal sores.

Ears – Ringing in ears (tinnitus) and Eustachian tube dysfunction (blocked, popping ears).

Throat – Vocal cord dysfunction, throat swelling, sores on tongue/mouth, itchy throat, burning mouth, and difficulty swallowing

Skin – Hives, angioedema (swelling of the skin), skin flushing, itching, skin rashes, dermatographism (when scratched skin causes a red welt), chronic itching, urticarial pigmentosa (legion/hive-like spots on the skin), flushing, bruising easily, reddish or pale complexion, cherry angiomata (skin growths), patchy red rashes, red face in the morning, cuts that won’t heal, fungal skin infections, and lichen planus.

Cardiovascular – Fainting, fainting upon standing, increased pulse rate (tachycardia), palpitations, spikes and drops in blood pressure, high pulse or temperature, high triglycerides, lightheadedness, dizzy, hot flashes, and postural orthostatic hypotension syndrome (POTS).

Respiratory – Wheezing, asthma, shortness of breath, difficulty breathing deep, air hunger, dry cough, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and chronic interstitial fibrosis.

GI Tract – Left upper abdominal pain, splenomegaly (enlarged spleen) epigastric tenderness, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and/or constipation, abdominal cramping, bloating, non-cardiac chest pain, malabsorption, GERD/acid reflux, cyclic vomiting syndrome, colonic polyps, and gastric polyps.

Liver – High bilirubin, elevated liver enzymes, and high cholesterol.

Neurological – Numbness and tingling (especially in the hands and feet), headaches, migraines tics, tremors, pseudo-seizures, true seizures, waxing and waning brain fog, memory loss, poor concentration, difficulty finding words, and spells of cataplexy (suddenly becoming disconnected from and unresponsive or unreactive to the world around).

Musculoskeletal – Muscle pain, fibromyalgia, increased osteopenia, osteoporosis, weakness, and migratory arthritis (joint pain).

Coagulation – History of clots, deep vein thrombosis, increased bruising, heavy menstrual bleeding, bleeding nose, and cuts that won’t stop bleeding.

Blood disorders – Anemia, increased white blood cell count, platelets, decreased white blood cell counts, decreased neutrophils, decreased lymphocytes, decreased platelets, reductions in CD4 helper lymphocytes, reductions in CD8 positive suppressor lymphocytes, reductions or excesses of IgA, IgG, IgM, IgE, a known condition called MGUS, myelodysplastic syndrome (reduced red cells, white cells, platelets), and increased MCV (mean corpuscular volume).

Psychiatry – Anxiety, panic, depression, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), decreased attention span, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), forgetfulness, and insomnia.

Genitourinary – Interstitial cystitis, recurrent bladder infections, sterile bladder infections, and frequent urination.

Hormones – Decreased libido, painful periods, heavy periods, infertility, and decreased sperm counts.

Dental – Deteriorating teeth.

Anaphylaxis – Difficulty breathing, itchy hives, flushing or pale skin, feeling warm after exposure, weak and rapid pulse, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, dizziness and fainting.

Figure 1. Some Potential Mast Cell Triggers2-5

    Heat, cold or sudden temperature changes
    Stress: emotional, physical, including pain, or environmental (i.e., weather changes, pollution, pollen, pet dander, etc.)
    Exercise
    Fatigue
    Food or beverages, including alcohol
    Drugs (opioids, NSAIDs, antibiotics and some local anesthetics) and contrast dyes
    Natural odors, chemical odors, perfumes and scents
    Venoms (bee, wasp, mixed vespids, spiders, fire ants, jelly fish, snakes, biting insects, such as flies, mosquitos and fleas, etc.)
    Infections (viral, bacterial or fungal)
    Mechanical irritation, friction, vibration
    Sun/sunlight

Conditions Associated with Mast Cell Activation Syndrome

Because MCAS is a chronic, multisystem, multisymptom condition with an inflammatory theme, it’s been associated with a number of conditions and diseases, including:

    Chronic inflammatory response syndrome
    Irritable bowel syndrome
    Gut dysbiosis – the gut is rich in mast cells and home to over 70% of the immune system. Parasites, bacteria, fungi, and parasites can all trigger gut mast cells.
    Obesity
    Diabetes
    Asthma and allergies
    Autism
    Autoimmune diseases (such as lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, and Hashimoto’s)
    Candida overgrowth
    Celiac disease
    Parasite infections
    Skin conditions such as eczema and psoriasis
    Food intolerances and allergies
    Gastroesophageal reflux (GERD)
    Infertility and endometriosis
    Chemical and medication sensitivities
    Postural orthostatic hypotension (POTS)
    CIRS – exposure to mold mycotoxins is a potent stimulator of mast cell activation
    Migraines
    Depression
    Fibromyalgia
    Fungal infections
    Tinnitus
    Multiple Sclerosis
    Cancer



MEDIATOR    POSSIBLE EFFECTS

Histamine    Flushing, itching, diarrhea, hypotension
Leukotrienes    Shortness of breath
Prostaglandins    Flushing, bone pain, brain fog, cramping
Tryptase    Osteoporosis, skin lesions
Interleukins    Fatigue, weight loss, enlarged lymph nodes
Heparin    Osteoporosis, problems with clotting/bleeding
Tumor Necrosis Factor-?    Fatigue, headaches, body aches


MAST CELL MEDIATOR SYMPTOMS
Anaphylaxis
Flushing of the face, neck, and chest
Itching, +/- rash
Hives, skin rashes
Angioedema (swelling)
Nasal itching and congestion
Wheezing and shortness of breath
Throat itching and swelling
Headache and/or brain fog, cognitive dysfunction, anxiety, depression
Diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, bloating, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)
Bone/muscle pain, osteosclerosis, osteopenia, osteoporosis
Light-headedness, syncope/fainting
Rapid heart rate, chest pain
Low blood pressure, high blood pressure at the start of a reaction, blood pressure instability
Uterine cramps or bleeding


« Last Edit: April 18, 2020, 08:25:47 AM by Hopeoneday »
Dr-pois.


Muon

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Re: Mast Cell Activation Syndrome
« Reply #156 on: April 19, 2020, 03:22:57 PM »
You have posted some interesting stuff HOD.

Increased IL-8 as a result of C. Albicans Infection (I had both), β-hexosaminidase piques my interest:

"We found that human mast cells have a versatile and timed response upon fungal encounter. Mast cells first degranulated β-hexosaminidase and were able to transiently reduce 30% of C. albicans viability up to 3 h post infection. In intermediate responses mast cells released pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-8 (IL-8) and supernatants of C. albicans-infected mast cells were chemoattractive to neutrophils. In late responses mast cells secreted IL-16 and anti-inflammatory IL-1ra and released mast cell extracellular traps (MCETs) that ensnared, but probably did not kill C. albicans."

Opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans elicits a temporal response in primary human mast cells

Role and Relevance of Mast Cells in Fungal Infections

I made a comment somewhere that perhaps mast cells could take up vitamin D since low levels are seen in MCAS and POIS patients. I was scrolling through the vitamin paper you have posted and stumbled upon this:

"It has been shown that mast cell granules contain vitaminD, which is not synthesized inside the granules. As mast cells may appear within the epidermis or in close proximity to it, it is reported that they do take-up vitamin D contained inside the epidermis' intercellular compartment. Therefore, vitamin D synthesized by the keratinocytes enter the intercellular compartment, where its synthesis is accomplished, and migrates towards the basement membrane. At the basal epidermis layer, or after passing through the basement membrane, vitamin D is taken up by mast cells, where it is stored inside its granules."

I also found this comment interesting, that CRH (stress hormone) could affect vitamin D receptors:
"CRH may influence mast cell activation, direct modulation of immune cells, angiogenesis and induction of some receptors including receptors for steroids, retinoids and vitamin D."

Vitamins and mast cells

A histochemical investigation on the percutaneous absorption of vitamin D synthesized into the mammal epidermis

"There is a need for provider education and awareness of this disease that could affect up to 17% of the population (!!!) on a spectrum from very mild to debilitating symptoms. MCAS is often either misdiagnosed or the diagnosis is greatly delayed due to a lack of provider awareness. "

https://europepmc.org/article/med/32282570
« Last Edit: April 19, 2020, 03:55:24 PM by Muon »

Muon

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Re: Mast Cell Activation Syndrome
« Reply #157 on: April 21, 2020, 09:55:49 AM »
Interesting cortisol discussions. I just recently completed CT scans of my adrenal glands, found benign nodules/tumors which might explain my resistance to blood pressure control meds. Under supervision of a nephrologist. I also have high creatinine count. Kidney problems have been a mystery to me.
I have massive reoccurring nasal polyps. After I get them removed my smell came back. Currently my polyps are giant and I can?t get surgery and I can?t smell or taste anything and they are too big to operate on
liver tests: a little fat and a small polyp
I am slightly anemic;)
I tore my knee ACL which is party healed unfortunately there is a cyst on the damaged tissue of my ACL
Also discovered there is a small cyst on my pituitary gland, which produces hCG mentioned in the paper.
-Pyro
i had a cyst removed from the top of my glans many years ago and it didn't cicatrize properly.
In my test results, I posted the doctors notes from my MRI angiogram (MRA). The doctor found what he believed to be a small bulge (aneurysm) in a blood vessel in my brain on the left side
I had a benign astrocytoma (brain tumor) removed when I was 5 years old.

Timestamp: 1:44:30
https://youtu.be/82dmZhCBuBo?t=6270
« Last Edit: September 15, 2020, 07:38:00 AM by Muon »

Hopeoneday

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Re: Mast Cell Activation Syndrome
« Reply #158 on: April 22, 2020, 07:00:58 AM »
I also noticed this. Nodules/tumors on glands, is this comon in poisers?
Dr-pois.

Muon

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Re: Mast Cell Activation Syndrome
« Reply #159 on: April 23, 2020, 10:28:47 AM »
If POIS is mast cell mediated or a manifestation of MCAS you would expect to see these patients show up at doctors treating mast cell diseases as well. So I have sent Dr. Theoharides an email and asked him if he encounters MCAS patients who are responding to sexual triggers (orgasm, arousal etc). He confirmed this with a 'Yes'.

Are there any poisers living in or close to New York (USA)? Leading expert in mast cell activation syndrome Dr. Afrin treats MCAS patients in New York at Armonk Integrative Medicine. http://www.armonkmed.com/about/dr-afrin/

Perhaps a bunch of POIS patients could try to visit him. Anyone?

Nas

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Re: Mast Cell Activation Syndrome
« Reply #160 on: April 23, 2020, 10:39:07 AM »
If POIS is mast cell mediated or a manifestation of MCAS you would expect to see these patients show up at doctors treating mast cell diseases as well. So I have sent Dr. Theoharides an email and asked him if he encounters MCAS patients who are responding to sexual triggers (orgasm, arousal etc). He confirmed this with a 'Yes'.

Are there any poisers living in or close to New York (USA)? Leading expert in mast cell activation syndrome Dr. Afrin treats MCAS patients in New York at Armonk Integrative Medicine. http://www.armonkmed.com/about/dr-afrin/

Perhaps a bunch of POIS patients could try to visit him. Anyone?
I also have talked with MCAS patients who react with sexual triggers. But the symptoms are generally typical MCAS, which usually involves anaphylaxis. What we need is MCAS sufferers who have similar symptoms to us. Also the usual treatment of anti-histamines seems to work for these people while it wouldn't for us.

Hopeoneday

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Re: Mast Cell Activation Syndrome
« Reply #161 on: April 23, 2020, 11:24:40 AM »
I can see a big pecentage of poisers who helped by antihistamines. This ilnes is multy systemic,
and need multysaystemic aproach, like MC patients the same,
I hawe 90% symptomes of anaphylaxsis.

Dr-pois.

Muon

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Re: Mast Cell Activation Syndrome
« Reply #162 on: April 23, 2020, 06:52:33 PM »
In short, i want to understand why does my body react so differently to orgasm following sex versus masturbation?...
  There are two reason given in the POIS literature for a difference between POIS from sex versus masturbation. The first reason comes from the paper:
  Progesterone deficiency, "Benign coital headache relieved by partner's pregnancies with implications for future treatment" (Selwyn Dexter, 2009)
  In this paper, they conclude that the male POIS patient benefited from his wife's progesterone (exchange of sexual bodily fluids). They tested this by giving the man a progesterone mimicking drug which relieved his POIS 95 percent.
  The second reason is given by the paper:
Mu-opioid receptor dysfunction, "Postorgasmic Illness Syndrome (POIS) in a Chinese Man: No Proof for IgE‐Mediated Allergy to Semen" (Jia Yin, et al, 2015)
  In this paper, they suggest that low beta-endorphin stimulation is the reason that POIS occurs. Beta-endorphin blocks some of the negative (immune suppressing) properties of norepinephrine, epinephrine and prostaglandin PGE2 (see post). Social interaction (especially with the opposite sex) can increase endorphin release. Laughter (comedy) is also a major endorphin releaser!

...And why do i have to sleep within 20min or so after sex to avoid POIS?...
  The short answer may be that sleep boost your immune system. The sleep response is the immune system telling your body that it is not strong enough to handle POIS. The first thing that happens during sleep is that epinephrine and norepinephrine levels drop, and melatonin levels increase:

Check this out. If you combine above theory with mast cell activation theory, all three parameters point in the same direction, coincidence?:

Melatonin: Inhibits mast cells (Increased melatonin = improved POIS symptoms)
Progesteron: Inhibits mast cells (Increased progesteron = improved POIS symptoms)
β‐Endorphin: Stimulates mast cells (Increased β‐Endorphin = worsening of POIS symptoms)

Table 1:
Neuroendocrinology of mast cells: Challenges and controversies

NSAIDs cause POIS symptoms for me, notably headaches and brain fog. To each there own.

This could be an indication that the ratio of Leukotriene/prostaglandin production might be skewed towards leukotriene production. A urine test for LTE4 can provide some insight. Some MCAS patients feel better while others feel worse on NSAIDs.
https://youtu.be/82dmZhCBuBo?t=6330
« Last Edit: April 23, 2020, 07:45:36 PM by Muon »

Limejuice

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Re: Mast Cell Activation Syndrome
« Reply #163 on: April 23, 2020, 08:04:52 PM »
Interesting...

Muon

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Re: Mast Cell Activation Syndrome
« Reply #164 on: April 24, 2020, 07:43:34 AM »
Demografx uses benadryl which is an anti-histamine used in mast cell disorders.
Forced sleep improves his POIS symptoms. This can be explained by a raise in melatonin which inhibits mast cells.
Testosterone can induce inhibitory effects on mast cells as well (especially skin MCs), hence the improvement of symptoms by dermal TRT.

He got multisystem symptoms, which are mysterious and non-specific. Mast cells could be responsible for his benign nodules, MCs guide tissue growth.

He also got other triggers like hot showers. Just do an analysis of every symptom from person to person on this board, list those and you will see a lot of similarities with MCAS.

Same thing with IronFeather. She sensitized to some standard changes of parameters in the body as a result of sexual activity. It gets worse over time. Same thing with her soy sensitivity. She was in a sensitization process up to the point of colitis (which is another condition that could be related to mast cell activation disease).

Maybe you're right. I don't know what to think anymore. I'd never heard about mast cell activation disease, but I've looked up some information recently and it seems a bit exaggerated to me, isn't it an illness that's supposed to cause random reactions to various substances, red rashes on the skin, allergy attacks...? Can a person have MCAD and only display symptoms of a sensitivity to a certain substance, and in the case of poisers, to sexual activity? Isn't it a dangerous disease that would have caused us serious problems by now?

Honestly, I'm worried and scared about how this is going to evolve in time. Back when I was a teenager I could never have imagined the magnitude of the symptoms I'm having now, so who know what is yet to come? Does MCAD pose any risk to the brain? That's what terrifies me the most, my entire life revolves around intellectual activities, am I going to lose it all because of a stupid random disease?

The disease (MCAS) can range from very mild (almost unnoticable) to extreme (shock). You can react randomly to various substances or only react consistent to one specific substance. The rashes and allergic attacks have the potential to be involved but they don't necessarily have to occur. Yes you can develop sensitivies to a certain substance, but the overal picture is that patients show multisystem symptoms which are non-specific. Pressure, low ambient temperatures and food are able to induce symptoms in you, which are, not suprisingly, known mast cell triggers. The step up in magnitude of the symptoms is also what you are seeing in MCAS. It is not considered a dangerous disease. Sometimes you can have moments where you think you are dying but you will recover from those (I had these moments myself).

And I have frequency of toilet visit only after orgasm and this condition lasts for almost 24 hours.

Serotonin release from intestinal mast cells?

Muon:
"Does histamine inhibit the mast cell? I'm confused, is this an error? Table 1:"
Neuroendocrinology of mast cells: Challenges and controversies

Dr. Theoharides:
"Histamine could inhibit mast cells via activation of H3 receptors"
« Last Edit: April 24, 2020, 10:12:35 AM by Muon »